New York Fashion Week stuts in the right direction

New York Fashion Week stuts in the right direction

New York Fashion Week (NYFW) made history in September when they showcased their most diverse casting of models. 

There has been a rise in the representation of minorities and other marginalized groups in media and other platforms, which has been met with praise and high success. Having people of different backgrounds lets people from all over the world see themselves represented on a huge stage. 

NYFW is being applauded for using people of all skin colours, body types, genders and sexualities across their 76 shows, which took place from Friday September 6th to Saturday September 14th. 

Out of the 2,203 models used during the week 44.8 percent of models on the runways were people of colour, this is 7.5 percent more than 2018’s 37.3 percent. Eight of the designers used more than 70 percent of models of colour in their shows, with Pyer Moss and Claudia Li using only models of colour to showcase their clothes. 

49 plus sized models were casted for this year’s season walking in 12 different shows, almost doubling from the 27 used last year in 8  shows. Chromat casted 13 plus sized models, which was the highest number this season, they also used 91.7 percent of people of colour. 

One show that was hailed for its diversity and inclusivity was SavagexFenty, which is Rihanna’s clothing line with Savage. Her casting got a lot of media attention for its diverse model choices which included models of different ethnicities, sexualities, genders and abilities (some models had prosthetic legs). 

In a clip from the show Rihanna said “It’s very important that the casting kind of tells the narrative of what the brand stands for, and what we stand for mainly here is inclusivity. That’s what I stand for with everything I create.” 

NYFW 2019 has helped in the fight to redefine beauty standards in the beauty and fashion world.

 

 

Photo on Wikimedia Commons

 

 

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Could Community Sponsorship be the Answer to Refugee Integration in Ireland?

Community Sponsorship is a pathway to resettlement that involves refugees being welcomed directly into a community by a group of people who have committed to helping them settle in and integrate. One group who have made this commitment are the St Luke’s Welcomes group in Cork City who realised they all shared a desire to act regarding the ongoing refugee crisis.

Mental Health: an entrepreneur’s struggle

As part of a series of articles to raise awareness about Movember, contributor Conor Kelly talks about experiences of dealing with mental and physical health issues. To give a real and complete insight of mental health struggles, he also talked to Andrea Horan, owner and entrepreneur of Tropical Popical.

Mental health: A musician and a psychotherapist

As part of a series of articles to raise awareness about Movember, contributor Conor Kelly talks about men’s experiences of dealing with mental and physical health issues. To do so, he interviewed a musician and a psychotherapist.

Movember: a young activist’s perspective

As part of a series of articles to raise awareness about Movember, contributor Conor Kelly talks about their own experience of dealing with mental and physical health issues.

#SexIsNotRent Scandal Shows Housing Crisis is Perfect Storm for Exploitation

#SexIsNotRent Scandal Shows Housing Crisis is Perfect Storm for Exploitation

It will come as no surprise to anyone, except perhaps the wealthy elite, that we are in the midst of a full-blown housing crisis. According to Focus Ireland, at the end of August 2019, there were over 910 young people living in emergency accommodation and the number of homeless families had increased by 348% since August 2014. These figures don’t even include the hidden homeless or those staying in domestic violence refuges. There is no shortage of land that can be used to build social housing. Yet, empty houses are sitting vacant while homelessness continues to rise. The housing crisis places homeless people and those who are renting in vulnerable situations where they are open to exploitation. 

Nothing highlights the huge power imbalance between landlords and renters more than the #SexIsNotRent scandal raised by Ruth Coppinger TD at the Dáil last month. A young woman living in Rathmines was sexually harassed by her landlord who said she could stay rent free until Christmas “if we can agree something.” The woman was lucky enough to be able to move on from the house but many aren’t so lucky. There is no official statistics in Ireland regarding landlords offering reduced or free rent for sex but it was reported in September 2018 by a YouGov poll in the UK that 250,000 women were offered reduced rent in exchange for sexual favours over the past five years.

Since this scandal broke, many more women have contacted Ruth Coppinger to say they have also been sexually harassed by their landlords. This unfortunate reality is a reflection of landlord greed and self entitlement in a country where misogynistic attitudes still permeate many aspects of women’s lives. Young women and other marginalised groups are more likely to work in precarious jobs on zero hour contracts and face heightened risk of sexual harassment by managers, bosses and the general public. They are also more likely to pay high rents, hence it is not surprising that landlords feel entitled to ask women for sexual favours in return for rent reductions. This begs the question: If your predator has the keys to your house, who are you going to turn to?

Landlords are empowered by a society that is a breeding ground for sexism and gender discrimination. In Ireland, victims are still shamed and disrespected; they are even told they were “asking for it”. The Irish Justice system is failing to protect victims of sexual assault as was clearly evidenced by both the Belfast Rugby Rape trial and the recent court case in Cork where a thong was used as evidence of the victim’s consent. Many cases of sexual violence go unreported and the few victims who do come forward rarely see justice delivered. The last Sexual Abuse and Violence in Ireland (SAVI) report was published seventeen years ago and there are no up-to-date statistics regarding the volume of unreported cases in Ireland. This problem will only get worse as the housing crisis continues.

Tellingly, one third of TDs in the Dail are landlords and most of them belong to Fine Gael or Fianna Fail. Their “solution” to the housing crisis involves reinforcing the need for private landlords through the HAP scheme and building co-living spaces and luxury student accommodation which many can’t afford. More recently, Solidarity-PBP’s Anti Eviction Bill has been blocked by the government even though it was passed in the Dáil. 

The housing crisis provides the perfect conditions for parasitic landlords to exploit the most vulnerable in our society – including exploiting renters for sex. Luckily, young people are becoming increasingly politically active, spurred on by recent gains like abortion rights and marriage equality. It is important to remember these rights were fought for, not handed to us by the establishment! We need to build a movement that challenges the rule of profit in society. A movement that fights for real rent controls and a ban on evictions. We must STAND together in this fight! 

Photo via Kim Buckley/Twitter

Browse more stories below or sign up to our newsletter to receive our top news straight in your inbox.

Could Community Sponsorship be the Answer to Refugee Integration in Ireland?

Community Sponsorship is a pathway to resettlement that involves refugees being welcomed directly into a community by a group of people who have committed to helping them settle in and integrate. One group who have made this commitment are the St Luke’s Welcomes group in Cork City who realised they all shared a desire to act regarding the ongoing refugee crisis.

Mental Health: an entrepreneur’s struggle

As part of a series of articles to raise awareness about Movember, contributor Conor Kelly talks about experiences of dealing with mental and physical health issues. To give a real and complete insight of mental health struggles, he also talked to Andrea Horan, owner and entrepreneur of Tropical Popical.

Mental health: A musician and a psychotherapist

As part of a series of articles to raise awareness about Movember, contributor Conor Kelly talks about men’s experiences of dealing with mental and physical health issues. To do so, he interviewed a musician and a psychotherapist.

Movember: a young activist’s perspective

As part of a series of articles to raise awareness about Movember, contributor Conor Kelly talks about their own experience of dealing with mental and physical health issues.

Diversity and inclusion in the workplace: Ireland is making slow progress

Last month, the Good Summit Ireland, hosted in Trinity College, aimed to create “a space for dialogue that motivates those who feel disengaged and disenchanted with how the world works, offering a platform for solidarity, with new ideas and empowerment.” Editor Rose attended a talk on the topic of diversity in the workplace and reports for STAND News.

Student mental health: Recharge and remain well

University is a brilliant time for students to learn new things. But it doesn’t come without its set of struggles. The Union of Students of Ireland (USI) launched their Re:Charge campaign, aiming to promote student mental health and get students thinking about ways that they can mind their mental health.

Abortion and gay marriage: change is coming in Northern Ireland

Abortion and gay marriage: change is coming in Northern Ireland

On Monday, a plenary session was held in Stormont, Northern Ireland’s Assembly. The Assembly, which has not sat in over a thousand days, was brought back together to try and vote about the decriminalisation of abortion and the legalisation of same sex marriage. 

 

What happened and why now?

Since January 2017, Northern Ireland lives without an Executive and an Assembly. So, eventually, Westminster had to pass a bill to keep these institutions running. On the 24th of July 2019, the Northern Ireland Act was granted. This bill extends the period for forming a new Northern Ireland Executive and states 13th of January 2020 as the new deadline for negotiation (which is pretty soon in negotiating time).

But this is not the only interesting thing about that bill. Labour MPs Conor Mc Ginn and Stella Creasy submitted two smart amendments to the vote: if by midnight the 21st of October 2019, no executive power was up running in Northern Ireland, then abortion would be decriminalised and same sex marriage would be legalised. The amendment passed easily in Westminster with 383 votes in favour and 73 against. 

As the due date was getting closer, the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) had a desperate attempt to stop this modernisation of Northern Ireland. It gathered more than 30 signatures of Members of the Legislative Assembly (MLA – Northern Ireland parliamentarians), the minimum required for a petition of concern. Therefore, the DUP was allowed to express its concerns before the assembly, called back for the occasion. 

The Social Democratic and Labour parties came but walked out during the session to protest. Several parties, such as Sinn Féin, Alliance, Green Party and People Before Profit, didn’t attend the session, acknowledging the “political stunt” of the DUP and the TUV (Traditionalist Unionist Voice). “They knew it was a political stunt that was going to fail and have no effect. But they did it anyway. In my view, they didn’t do themselves any favours and they didn’t do these institutions and the efforts to reestablish them any favours”, says Sinn Féin’s MLA for East Derry, Caoimhe Archibald (see full interview below).

Eventually, abortion and same-sex marriage rights were not even discussed in what was a really short session. Less than one hour was all the time needed for the (DUP) Speaker to deny the vote and debate on the concerns expressed through the petition. In fact, it would be controversial if he’d decide whether to hold a vote or not in the Assembly. A new Speaker has to be elected on cross-community basis for a long time now, and only this new Speaker would be entitled to make such a decision to hold a vote or not. 

 

What legal regime during the transition period and afterwards? 

So here we are, after 21st of October 2019. Northern Ireland didn’t get an Executive on Monday. No bill was able to be passed in the Assembly. Section 58 and 59 of the Offences Against the Person Act 1861, criminalizing abortion, have been repealed and new abortion regulation should be implemented in the North by the 31st of March 2020. 

From now on, no criminal charges can be brought against any women getting an abortion, nor against anyone delivering an abortion. All the current investigations and cases made against women seeking an abortion in the past and not closed yet, will be dropped.

Between now and the end of March, women can’t hope to get an abortion on Northern Irish soil unless they meet the criteria of “fatal or serious fetal anomality” and are not pregnant for more than 28 weeks. So, for a little longer, women will have to travel to Britain. However, they can call the Central Booking in England and their travel and accommodation expenses will be funded, regardless of the individual’s income. One carer’s expenses can also be covered, so that women don’t have to go through the abortion process on their own oversea. 

From April, two sites in Northern Ireland will be open to abortion. The North should be one of the first jurisdiction to organize buffer zones around the abortion sites, prosecuting anyone trying to protest in the area. Also, medical staff should get proper training on abortion cares. 

The British Government has until the 13th of January 2020 to legalise gay marriage. As a 28-day notice is needed before a wedding can take place, the first gay marriage in Northern Ireland should be celebrated around Valentine’s Day, in February 2020. 

 

What was the legal regime so far?

So far, in Northern Ireland, women could only get an abortion if there was a “risk of real and serious adverse effect on their physical or mental health, which is either long term or permanent”. This regime of exception went against the Abortion Act 1967 that makes abortion legal on several grounds up to 28 weeks in Britain. More than 1,000 Northern Irish women travel to Britain every year to get an abortion. 

Same sex marriage was neither performed nor even recognized in Northern Ireland. Civil Partnership was granted to gay couple in 2005, and presented as an adequate alternative. 

 

 

Photo and video by Shannon Takahashi 

 

Watch down below the full interview of Sinn Féin’s MLA for East Derry, Caoimhe Archibald and a vox-pop made on Queen’s University’s campus (Belfast) on Monday Morning.

Student Mental Health: 1 in 3 Experience Depression

Student Mental Health: 1 in 3 Experience Depression

A recent survey on student mental health, conducted by the Union of Students in Ireland (USI), reveals that a large number of students are or have experienced some sort of mental health issue, ranging from anxiety to depression.

A total of 3,340 students across the island of Ireland responded to the survey with 38.4% of these reporting “extremely severe levels of anxiety”, 29.9% reporting depression and 32.2% of respondents saying they had a formal diagnosis of mental health difficulties at some point in their lives. The study shows that gender is a significant factor: non-binary students have the highest levels of severe anxiety at 61.3% while transgender students are most likely to be “severely extremely depressed.” A financial factor on student mental health also comes up with 52% of those depending on Credit Union loans reporting severe anxiety. 77.8% of those without stable living arrangements report depression. 23% of students surveyed had used an on-campus counselling service in the past while only 0.4% report that there was no wait in accessing the service. Most people find the service helpful but only 36.8% report being offered as many sessions as they needed. The majority of those who reported having a formal diagnosis of a mental health difficulty made use of the counselling service.

The report includes some qualitative elements with respondents given the opportunity to share some comments on their experiences of seeking help and their opinions. There were a wide range of experiences with both very positive and very negative feedback coming through. What comes through very strongly is the fact that students are most likely to seek help from an on-campus counselling service but there is also an inconsistency in the success of help available. For some students, the long waiting lists have been a barrier to them using the counselling service while others found the counselling services were under-resourced and not equipped to deal with their specific range of needs. At the launch of the report in Trinity College Dublin Gertie Raftery of the PCHEI (psychological counsellors in higher education in Ireland) commented about difficulties with the transience of students and the need for students to be able to access the same full range of care while at college as they can at home. Students may find they have to go through the convoluted process of transferring between local mental health services when they go away to college. A kind of health passport has been mentioned as a possible solution whereby students could easily access a full range of mental health services both at their place of study and at home.

Minister for Higher Education, Mary Mitchell O’Connor opened the launch. The minister spoke at length about the need for increased mental health literacy and also put the onus on the Higher Education Institutes (HEI) to respond to the report. However, she seemed reluctant to mention increased funding or resources for third level mental health services nor did she seem to address students’ difficulties in accessing mental health services while studying away from home. Later at the launch a student panel highlighted the need for funding and investment in fully staffed counselling services, but the minister had left by that stage.

In its pre-budget submission for the upcoming budget, USI have already proposed €100,000 additional funding per HEI which would cover the average salary of 1.5 additional counselling psychologists, €120,000 per HEI to support the adoption of a peer-lead support programme, and  €500,000 funding to support a pilot programme of 5 Student Support Coordinators for more effective case management for students who have complex mental health difficulties. It is still unclear if these proposals will be met. 

Ruairí Weiner is the President of Maynooth University Mental Health Society and was asked by the USI to give a student response to the report which is included as part of the report

 

 

Photo: Ruairi Weiner, Minister for Higher Education Mary Mitchell O’Connor, USI President Lorna Fitzpatrick, Former Chairperson of DCU Mental Health Society Sorcha Murphy

 

 

Browse more stories below or sign up to our newsletter to get our top news straight to your inbox.

Could Community Sponsorship be the Answer to Refugee Integration in Ireland?

Community Sponsorship is a pathway to resettlement that involves refugees being welcomed directly into a community by a group of people who have committed to helping them settle in and integrate. One group who have made this commitment are the St Luke’s Welcomes group in Cork City who realised they all shared a desire to act regarding the ongoing refugee crisis.

Mental Health: an entrepreneur’s struggle

As part of a series of articles to raise awareness about Movember, contributor Conor Kelly talks about experiences of dealing with mental and physical health issues. To give a real and complete insight of mental health struggles, he also talked to Andrea Horan, owner and entrepreneur of Tropical Popical.

Mental health: A musician and a psychotherapist

As part of a series of articles to raise awareness about Movember, contributor Conor Kelly talks about men’s experiences of dealing with mental and physical health issues. To do so, he interviewed a musician and a psychotherapist.

Movember: a young activist’s perspective

As part of a series of articles to raise awareness about Movember, contributor Conor Kelly talks about their own experience of dealing with mental and physical health issues.

Diversity and inclusion in the workplace: Ireland is making slow progress

Last month, the Good Summit Ireland, hosted in Trinity College, aimed to create “a space for dialogue that motivates those who feel disengaged and disenchanted with how the world works, offering a platform for solidarity, with new ideas and empowerment.” Editor Rose attended a talk on the topic of diversity in the workplace and reports for STAND News.

Student mental health: Recharge and remain well

University is a brilliant time for students to learn new things. But it doesn’t come without its set of struggles. The Union of Students of Ireland (USI) launched their Re:Charge campaign, aiming to promote student mental health and get students thinking about ways that they can mind their mental health.

Tunisia and Quebec become the latest places to restrict the Islamic veil in public spaces

Tunisia and Quebec become the latest places to restrict the Islamic veil in public spaces

Earlier this month, Tunisia banned the wearing of the niqab (a religious veil covering all but the eyes) in government offices following recent reports that terrorists have been using the religious garment as a disguise. This is not the first time in recent history that religious veiling has been banned, in Tunisia or elsewhere, but rather the latest in a decade-long trend of ‘burqa bans’ and other limitations on religious freedom and expression in public places in many different countries and regions. 

In 2015 the Muslim-majority country Chad banned the full veil following two suicide bomb attacks, citing security concerns similar to those expressed by Tunisian officials this year. Cameroon also banned the Islamic face veil after suicide bombings in 2015. 

Although Muslim women have been the most widely affected by the various bans, limitations on religious-wear and symbols in public have also affected those of other faiths.

Last month Quebec passed a law known as Bill 21 prohibiting certain public employees such as teachers, civil servants, and police officers from wearing religious symbols at work, including Muslim veils, Jewish skullcaps, Skikh turbans and any other religous headwear. Supporters of the bill claim that it protects secularity within Quebecois society. However, the ban has faced strong opposition, including challenges to its constitutionality. Lawyer Catherine McKenzie claims the bill “amounts to criminal legislation by seeking to regulate religion for a moral purpose,” according to the Montreal Gazette

Quebec’s Bill 21 follows in the steps of their fellow French-speakers in Europe. In April 2011, France became the first European country to ban the full-face Islamic veil in any public place outside of the home, imposing a fine upon violators. In 2018 the Huffington post reported  that the UN Human Rights Committee declared “France’s ban on the niqab and burqa is a violation of Muslim women’s rights,” finding unpersuasive the claim that the ban was for security reasons.

The trend of banning religious headwear in public spaces has spread across Europe over the past decade. Belgium outlawed any clothing that obscures one’s face in public spaces in 2011, with a fine similar to France’s in place for violation of the law. The Netherlands approved a partial ban on the full veil in schools, hospitals and on public transport in 2015, also citing public security concerns as the basis for the law. Austria’s ruling coalition agreed to prohibit full-face veils in public spaces such as courts and schools in 2017. 

At the heart of the contentious debate over these regulations is the question of balance between religious freedom of expression and public security. Muslim women, disproportionately affected by the laws, are perceived as a security threat by merely adhering to the teachings of their religious faith. 

This stems from a broader debate, which has grown louder in the years since 9/11, regarding the veiling of Muslim women in Western society: European cultures often perceive covered Muslim women as oppressed by their dress, insisting they should be “protected” through un-veiling. Many see the face veil as a symbol of Islamic terrorism rather than an expression of personal religious faith, and without adequate representation among the powers proposing these laws, Islamic women will more often be forced to choose between practicing their faith and breaking the law.

Photo courtesy of Azamat-Zhanisov via Unsplash

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Weinstein New York Trial Begins

The New York trial of former movie mogul Harvey Weinstein commenced in the past week and is estimated to last two months. Weinstein is charged with five sex crime charges. Weinstein has pleaded not guilty and denies all allegations of nonconsensual sexual encounters. If convicted of these acts, he will likely face the rest of his life behind bars.

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New Year, Same Brexit Headache

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Book Review: New York Times Journalists Take On Weinstein in ‘She Said’

New York Times journalists, Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey broke the story about Harvey Weinstein in October 2017. The publication of the first piece on Weinstein led to an influx of messages into Kantor and Twohey’s inboxes from women who had also experienced sexual harassment or assault. In She Said, they explain the process behind their investigative journalism.

Is Political Reform on the Horizon for Kazakhstan?

Kazakhstan has been under autocracy since it first began to be taken over by the Russian Empire in the 18th century, throughout its years as part of the Soviet Union, and since its independence in 1991. After all that time, could it be possible that the country is heading towards future democracy?

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Women’s World Cup: A Game of Two Halves

Women’s World Cup: A Game of Two Halves

The popularity of this summer’s Women’s World Cup was unprecedented…

Record numbers of viewers tuned in to watch the matches. England’s semi-final match against the United States (US), with nearly 12 million views, was the most watched English TV programme of the year. Ditto France’s quarter-final match against the US.  

US viewership of the final in which its team defeated the Netherlands 2-0 was 22% higher than the 2018 men’s final. Remarkably, 88% of Dutch TV viewers also watched the match. Overall, FIFA estimates that this year’s World Cup has attracted one billion viewers for the first time in history. 

Despite Ireland’s team failing to qualify, Irish viewers also tuned-in in their droves, with a peak audience of 315,000 watching England’s dramatic defeat on RTE (surprise, surprise). The fact that Michele O’Neill was assistant referee during the final (becoming the first ever Irish woman to referee a World Cup soccer match) also helped to pique interest levels. 

There are several reasons for the dramatic take-off in viewership for this year’s World Cup. 

For one thing, the skill levels in the women’s game are increasing year on year. In soccer, skill is most accurately measured by the number of passes in a game, rather than by the number of goals. For instance, a typical English Premier League game contains more than 900 passes but this falls to about 650 passes for games in the fourth division. The average number of passes in this year’s World Cup is up 10% on 2015 levels, with latest figures from Opta showing the average game had 825 passes – and that data does not even factor in the knock-out games! The prize money on offer also doubled to 30 million dollars, compared with the 2015 prize pot. The fact that most countries broadcast the World Cup on free-to-air channels like RTE also helped to win more viewers.

Another key reason for the growth in women’s football is the transformative power of new, multi-million sponsorship deals. Some sponsors like Visa are now spending equally on promoting the women’s World Cup as on the men’s. UEFA’s recent unbundling of the rights to the women’s competitions in Europe also encouraged many female-focused brands like Avon to get involved. 

However, issues remain. The annual global wage for a female professional footballer is around 7000 dollars. In England, which has one of the wealthier competitions, a female footballer barely takes home one-hundredth of what a Premier League male footballer makes. These financial issues lead many female footballers to consider throwing in their proverbial boots. 

The US women’s team marked International Women’s Day 2019 by filing a class-action suit against their employer, the United States Soccer Federation, alleging that differences in pay and employment conditions between the women’s and men’s teams violate the Equal Pay Act and the Civil Rights Act because the women’s team is getting paid less despite engaging in “substantially equal work”

The US team also called out the FIFA scheduling of the World Cup final as “disrespectful” to the women’s game due to the decision to schedule the Copa America final and the Gold Cup final on the same day.

Closer to home, the FAI has attracted criticism for its perceived failure to truly progress the women’s game. Colin Bell, the former manager of the Irish women’s team, recently stepped down due to his frustration with how women’s football is being handled in this country. In Ireland, aside from the Senior Cup final, there is little to no coverage of domestic women’s football in the media or on television and the women’s game is definitely not getting the attention, nor the financial support, it needs and deserves. 

Don’t be a Fairweather Fan. Let’s show that our support for women’s football is not a passing fad! Now that the furor of the World Cup has passed, why not find out more about the Irish women’s national team and consider going to see them playing in person?

Photo courtesy of US Soccer WNT via Twitter

Browse more stories below, or sign up to our newsletter to receive our top news straight into your inbox.

Weinstein New York Trial Begins

The New York trial of former movie mogul Harvey Weinstein commenced in the past week and is estimated to last two months. Weinstein is charged with five sex crime charges. Weinstein has pleaded not guilty and denies all allegations of nonconsensual sexual encounters. If convicted of these acts, he will likely face the rest of his life behind bars.

Book Review: Klein Gifts Us With Tools to Unite Climate Action in ‘On Fire’

Naomi Klein is as accessible as ever as she dissects the scientific and economic jargon of climate change, while simultaneously injecting empathy and passion in her fight to hold corporations and fossil fuel companies accountable. On Fire: The Burning Case for a Green New Deal, has the possibility to unite the movement once again and inspire action on a scale that humanity has never accomplished before.

New Year, Same Brexit Headache

Brexit day is fast approaching, with the UK on track to officially leave the European Union in less than two weeks. In this article in our Brexit series, Rachel gives us an update on the Withdrawal Agreement Bill and the future of Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Book Review: New York Times Journalists Take On Weinstein in ‘She Said’

New York Times journalists, Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey broke the story about Harvey Weinstein in October 2017. The publication of the first piece on Weinstein led to an influx of messages into Kantor and Twohey’s inboxes from women who had also experienced sexual harassment or assault. In She Said, they explain the process behind their investigative journalism.

Is Political Reform on the Horizon for Kazakhstan?

Kazakhstan has been under autocracy since it first began to be taken over by the Russian Empire in the 18th century, throughout its years as part of the Soviet Union, and since its independence in 1991. After all that time, could it be possible that the country is heading towards future democracy?

Unsustainable Biking?

A lot of us are aware that our carbon footprint is terrible and that we have to change our habits. For some of us, this means leaving the car behind and starting to bike. Unfortunately, the way we “consume” biking is an ecological issue.