Climate justice panel urges student activists not to underestimate their power

Climate justice panel urges student activists not to underestimate their power

The breakdown of our planet is the farthest thing from fair, targeting those most vulnerable in our society rather than the actual culprits causing the earth’s devastation. STAND’s Student Festival hosted a panel discussion targeting this exact issue on November 7th at TUD’s Aungier Street campus, featuring five excellent speakers from a range of backgrounds and specialities.

In a typical Irish rainy, darkened evening, the climate justice panel drew a great turnout of interested students who have valid concerns about the role we can all play in steering the course of history away from more damage and destruction. The panel was excellently mediated by TU Dublin’s VP Welfare Officer Moya Browne, and welcomed experienced guests who each had something unique to offer. Niall Sargent, editor of Green News, podcaster and sustainable fashion activist Molly Parsons, Manuel Salazar of Extinction Rebellion Ireland, Clodagh Daly from Climate Case Ireland and Daniel Whooley of the Green Party provided careful analysis of the inequalities facing people in the Global South as well as reflecting on the failure of Irish politicians to tackle climate justice.  The importance of enacting legislation which will hold corporations and fossil fuel companies to account was also stressed heavily, but the panel brought positive energy and uplifting attitudes towards student activism. It wasn’t all doom and gloom. 

The panelists were quizzed on numerous topics after introducing themselves, with each guest having changed their focus towards the climate at varying stages of their lives. Niall Sargent credits his wife for enlightening him about environmental damage, and brings hard news and investigations to the Green News website. Molly Parsons described herself as a ‘self-confessed Xico Mondays PrettyLittleThing hun’ who grew up in a capitalist system with infinite materialist values. She began a podcast and took part in No Buy November, discovered the world of slow and sustainable fashion and the rest is history. Her lifestyle changes are now influencing her 13,500 Instagram followers and Depop audience, so the activist is definitely one to watch. 

Manuel Salazar grew up in Venezuela, a country polluted and essentially commanded by oil. Salazar has seen first-hand the effects of fossil fuel damage in his home country and the morally reprehensible corruption of these corporations. His work for Extinction Rebellion has helped the protesters form a movement in Ireland, which has grown in membership from about ten people to 200 within one year. Councillor Daniel Whooley described the paralysing fear he experienced after seeing IPCC reports broadcast on TV, which led him to run in local Ongar elections at the tender age of 20. 

Clodagh Daly’s work with Climate Case Ireland brings the issue of law into the environmental fray. If the campaigner was ever oblivious to climate change, she doesn’t remember that part of her life. She has always seen the crisis through the lens of government and corporate policy, and learned about migrant injustice and climate class prejudice while living in Chile. Seeing a country whose resources are relentlessly exploited and privatised inspired Clodagh to turn her focus to activism.

The topic of greenwashing, or companies appearing more eco-friendly than they really are in order to benefit their products or services, was brought up almost immediately during the event. The population are being bombarded with lies regarding the state of the planet, and what they can do to bring about positive change. So, who can we trust? 

Molly emphasises the fact that young activists may not be experts or scientists, but they bring fear and passion to the forefront of the issue. Using their eco-grief to give rise to a movement has allowed regular people of Ireland to access protests and receive information in a way that they can understand. Disseminating knowledge in a way that allows everyone to join in is crucial, according to Niall. It’s a “pathetic defence mechanism” when political leaders ask the public for answers, Molly insists. 

How can students themselves make their mark on such an abysmal crisis, when most of us are scraping together our five cent coins for a measly chicken roll? Clodagh advises to push every party to treat climate justice as a societal issue that is permanently tied to factors such as housing, gender, class, race and Direct Provision. Daniel suggests joining Extinction Rebellion or even running in the election. Molly tells the audience to “arm yourselves with information”, read widely around the topic and observe small changes in food wastage and spending habits.

Moya later poses the question of communities who are most affected by climate change, with Niall putting the spotlight on Western habits of outsourcing our problems to less developed countries to achieve short-term perceived fixes. Only recently, Bord na Móna were linked to the palm oil industry in Indonesia, importing peat but abusing the land of those communities: “Countries which are contributing the least are being affected the most by climate injustice,” Molly says. “Western society has been stuffing that hole with money, offering  charity to victims of natural disasters while actively causing more problems.” Leo Varadkar’s recent comments on climate change bringing us the “benefits” of warmer weather is a classic facepalm example of obliviousness. 

Molly posits that our education system urgently requires scientists and experts to speak to children rather than teachers. Western countries are already witnessing the effects of climate breakdown at an increasing rate. “Every single step I make, I think about my children or the world ending,” Molly continues. Young people marching now must juggle hormones, the formation of their identity and school with politics, ineffective governments and the incoming apocalypse. “How hard must that be to deal with?” she says. 

Despite the impending disaster, Manuel is determined to stay positive. He maintains that it’s the best time in history to be an activist, with children inspiring adults rather than the other way around. Resources and borders are controlling our humanity, with certain humans being regarded as worth more than others, but soon it will come to a tipping point. The panellists are confident that the next generation will continue the fight: “When hope dies, action begins,” Manuel says, smiling. “We have the people on our side.”

 

Photo by Kate Brayden

 

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The European Investment Bank’s decision to divest from fossil fuels

The European Investment Bank (EIB) recently announced that it would be phasing out investment in fossil fuel companies by 2021. The EIB is the biggest public lender globally and the move was celebrated by those within the banking industry and the environmental movement. It sends a clear message that markets are moving away from fossil fuels and towards renewable energies.

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Single-Use Plastics levies: The Good, the Bad, and The Ugly

Last week the Minister for the Environment announced that the Irish Government would be introducing a number of levies aimed at reducing single-use plastics. Two of the most notable levies being a ‘latte levy’ on disposable cups and a plastic bag levy increase. This is good news – so why has there been a murmur of controversy around this announcement?

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The Validity of Plane-Shaming

The Validity of Plane-Shaming

The no-flying trend isn’t new. We all know or have heard of someone who prefers to spend hours on a train rather than hopping on a plane to go on holiday. But things have got to a new level with plane shaming, a new concept whereby travelers are meant to feel guilty about the carbon footprint of their flights. The burning topic has taken centre stage after climate activist Greta Thunberg sailed to the United States on a zero-carbon solar-powered yacht last summer. Although the journey was a perilous one, and took days to complete, it is the only way the teen activist accepted to travel across the pond. 

Although the impact of flights on the environment and the climate is a growing concern for many people, many think that other forms of transport are simply inaccessible for overseas travels. Budget airlines offer incredibly competitive prices which allows the public to travel for a variety of reasons – to see family, to access healthcare or other treatments, and even to work. 

Plane shaming seems to have more reach, as many influencers, celebrities, presidents and ministers are questioned on their use of private planes as a mode of transport. These  individuals often take private flights that may carry as little as two people, and yet do not use less fuel than a regular flight carrying hundreds of people. 

Furthermore, short flights are said to produce a larger amount of greenhouse gas emissions per passenger than other lengths of flights. According to Vox, a “one-way flight across the Atlantic from New York City to London emits one ton of carbon dioxide per passenger. There are upward of 2,500 flights over the North Atlantic every day.”

Flying is not in fact the most popular method of public transport, with only one fifth of the global population having ever taken a flight. Unfortunately, this means that these very few amount of fliers are accounting for the 2.5% of carbon emissions worldwide which are due to air travel. Reports also suggest that if nothing is done, by 2050, air travel could account to a quarter of the planet’s carbon budget.  

Things are slowly looking up, however. Some initiatives are starting to push the no-flying movement, such as “We Stay On The Ground” in 2018, which mainly aimed to convince people to pledge to living without flying for at least a year. Greta Thunberg travels across Europe by train, and when she was attending the United Nations Climate Action Summit in the U.S, she travelled on a zero-carbon boat. It is said that the Greta effect has caused fewer flights in Sweden, her home country. 

However, the individual may not be the one to blame. When asked how she felt on the topic of individuals taking flights less often or not at all, final year journalism student at Dublin City University, Clara Kelly, said “a large majority of people can’t afford to travel by ferry, yet still need to have access to leaving the country”. 

Sonja Tutty, vice-chair of DCU’s STAND society, said that individuals should not be the only ones held responsible. “It’s also up to corporations – and especially the aviation industry in this case – to change, because they are the biggest contributors to the problem. Moreover, Instead of shaming people for using planes, governments can try and develop their public transport, and make sustainable alternatives more affordable and accessible,” she concluded.

 

 

Photo by Jordan Sanchez on Unsplash

 

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Queen of England going “fur-free” is a step in the right direction

We’ve learnt it from Angela Kelly, Senior Dresser of Queen Elizabeth II of England: The Queen is going fur-free. By “going faux”, The Queen is setting a strong example and sending a powerful message, encouraging an ethical fashion trend that we should all follow. But we have mixed feelings about the lack of coherence between the Country’s statements about fur.

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What is Ecofeminism?

Ecofeminism is a movement that unites two issues close to our hearts at STAND: women’s rights and the environment. It is perhaps one of the most useful ways we can look at a wide range of social issues we face today. However, the term may be unfamiliar to many.

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Will the G7 Fashion Pact change fashion for the better?

Will the G7 Fashion Pact change fashion for the better?

As people have become increasingly aware of how our lifestyles damage the environment, the devastating impact of the fashion industry on our planet has become more widely known. 73% of our clothes go to a landfill or an incinerator when they are thrown away, despite the potential recyclability of these fabrics. Fashion uses up huge amounts of water, both in the growth of raw materials like cotton as well as in the manufacturing of clothes. On top of this, according to the UN, the fashion industry contributes 10% of total greenhouse gas emissions, using more energy than the aviation and shipping industries combined.

It is undeniable that we need to urgently change the fashion industry. In light of this, a new ‘Fashion Pact’ was announced at the G7 summit this August. The pact aims to improve the fashion industry by setting targets on three fronts – Climate, Biodiversity and Ocean. The Climate commitment includes measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, including carbon offsetting schemes and renewable energy use. The Biodiversity commitment focuses on ways to protect ecosystems, by promoting wildlife-friendly agriculture for growing clothing materials. The elimination of the use of single-use plastics and the reduction of water pollution to protect our seas are the main commitments in the Ocean section. The pact also suggests joint initiatives between companies, such as agreeing to transparency schemes and supporting technological innovation.

The pact aims to sign up 20% of the fashion industry and at the moment 32 companies, owning about 150 brands in total, have signed it. These include the likes of H&M, Zara and Nike as well as more ‘up-market’ brands like Chanel and Giorgio Armani. 

While this may seem like a leap forward in reducing the environmental impact of fashion, it remains to be seen whether this will make any difference. Several commitments already exist in the global fashion industry, such as the UN Fashion Industry Charter for Climate Change and the Circular Fashion System Commitment. Given that many of the brands signing on to the G7 Fashion Pact have already agreed to these existing standards, it is not clear what real difference this pact will make, especially as it is not legally binding and clearly states that the goals it includes are only suggestions for the companies. One could argue that these companies would have already implemented their previous commitments if they actually cared about the environment… Consumer awareness of the importance of sustainable fashion has increased massively since the signing of the other deals, so these companies might just be trying to persuade consumers that they are environmentally friendly by signing the Fashion Pact, rather than actually planning on implementing it.  

In defence of the G7 Fashion pact, it is one of the only fashion industry agreements that focuses on the promotion of biodiversity. However, disappointedly the commitments in this section are vaguely worded and have no numerical targets or time limits for actions to be taken. The pact nevertheless has slightly more focus on collaboration between companies than in previous agreements, which could potentially help inspire more action. However, some sections of the agreement, especially those relating to collaboration, are merely vague guidelines, and do not add much value on top of collaboration suggestions in other agreements.

Overall, the Fashion Pact is underwhelming and unlikely to create change. Even in the best case scenario, if 20% of the industry actually implemented its suggestions, the other 80% may not do anything.This is not enough to stop climate change. What is more likely to actually make a difference is consumers voting with their wallets to force companies to change, and our governments creating laws targeting the pollution created by fashion companies. Without these actions, the Fashion Pact’s commitments are unlikely to be upheld.

 

 

Photo by Christian Fregnan on Unsplash

 

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The European Investment Bank’s decision to divest from fossil fuels

The European Investment Bank (EIB) recently announced that it would be phasing out investment in fossil fuel companies by 2021. The EIB is the biggest public lender globally and the move was celebrated by those within the banking industry and the environmental movement. It sends a clear message that markets are moving away from fossil fuels and towards renewable energies.

What is Ecofeminism?

Ecofeminism is a movement that unites two issues close to our hearts at STAND: women’s rights and the environment. It is perhaps one of the most useful ways we can look at a wide range of social issues we face today. However, the term may be unfamiliar to many.

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Friday 22nd November marks the day that Climate Case Ireland lodged an appeal for the dismissal of their High Court case from January 2019. The coalition of members of Friends of the Irish Environment Ireland stated that an application has been made to both the Court of Appeal and the Supreme Court. The group must lie in wait to hear whether the Supreme Court will permit the hearing of their case at this time.

Why the EU-Mercosur worries environmentalists

Why the EU-Mercosur worries environmentalists

Last June, after 20 years of negotiations, the EU signed a trade agreement in principle with the South American trade bloc Mercosur, the fifth-largest economy in the world. That deal would open a large market to Mercosur’s not suspended member states – Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay – multiplying the current trade value of €88 billion. 

Up to 90 percent of tariffs on goods would be eliminated on both sides. Europe would save on goods such as wine, spirits, chocolate, biscuits, tinned peaches, and olives, and import a quota of 99 tonnes of beef per year, as well as 180’000 tonnes of sugar and 100’000 tonnes of poultry. The EU hopes the deal would expand its access to South American telecommunications, transport, and financial services, and expects it to make the region more attractive to American, Japanese, and South Korean markets. 

Protestors of the deal from the farming sector worry that South American beef imports would hurt local European farms. One concern is described by The Irish Times as Brazil’s reputation for “meat fraud”, since the country does not follow the same ethical and food safety standards imposed under EU regulations.

While the EU claims that both parties would have the power to put regulations on imports should any harm come to local markets, it is unclear how long these measures can be put in place and exactly each sector would be protected.

Despite intentions to expand the high-carbon beef industry, the deal explicitly references the Paris Climate Agreement with commitments to fight climate change and to transition to a “sustainable, low carbon economy”. But to meet this goal, rigorous enforcement of regulations on the quotas would need to be put in place whether or not harm does come to local markets.

As for the deal’s sure environmental degradation, Mercosur members would have to further eat into their cattle ranching land. In Brazil, climate change denier and deforestation enthusiast President Jair Bolsonaro naturally contradicts environmental protection and sustainable development efforts. He has threatened to tear down the Amazon rainforest to make room for more beef farms, and is widely condemned by international media for intentionally starting this year’s Amazonian wildfires with his policies. 

Since 1978 over 780’000 square kilometres of Amazonian rainforest has been destroyed across Brazil, Peru, Columbia, Bolivia, Venezuela, Suriname, Guyane, and French Guiana for cattle ranching, soy farms, mineral excavations, palm oil extractions, urban planning and illegal logging projects. According to satellite data, Brazil has by far lost the most tree cover in comparison to other countries which share the Amazon. 

To come into effect, the draft Mercosur Agreement must be ratified by the European Council and the European Parliament, as well as by the Mercosur Parliament. This may be a very long process.

Irish Taoiseach Leo Varadkar said his government will block the deal, unless Brazil takes steps to protect the Amazonian rainforest. Varadkar previously said his government would assess the financial impact of the deal, but supported the deal’s bid for billions in savings on trade duties for Irish companies. 

The opposition party Sinn Fein led political support to reject the deal. A majority in the Dail voted against it and called for the Irish government to form alliances with other EU members to do the same. However, the deal must pass under the EU Trade Council for any opposition to be considered in law.

In Austria, the draft deal was rejected by the national Parliament EU’s subcommittee. Together with Ireland, they may use their veto in two years’ time to block the EU-Mercosur deal.

 

 

Photo by chuttersnap on Unsplash

 

 

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The European Investment Bank’s decision to divest from fossil fuels

The European Investment Bank (EIB) recently announced that it would be phasing out investment in fossil fuel companies by 2021. The EIB is the biggest public lender globally and the move was celebrated by those within the banking industry and the environmental movement. It sends a clear message that markets are moving away from fossil fuels and towards renewable energies.

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What is Ecofeminism?

Ecofeminism is a movement that unites two issues close to our hearts at STAND: women’s rights and the environment. It is perhaps one of the most useful ways we can look at a wide range of social issues we face today. However, the term may be unfamiliar to many.

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How Looking Good Can Help the Environment – Sustainable Fashion from the Ones in the Know

How Looking Good Can Help the Environment – Sustainable Fashion from the Ones in the Know

This week, Trinity students gathered in a full auditorium to hear from slow fashion influencers about how they can make their wardrobe more sustainable. Alba Mullen, a final year Politics and Economics student in Trinity College Dublin, who also runs her own sustainable fashion page called Traashion, moderated a panel of some of Ireland’s most prominent sustainable clothing activists in the Slow Fashion Panel Discussion and Upcycling Masterclass. This event was held on Tuesday night and run by STAND and Suas Trinity as part of the annual STAND Student Festival.

The lecture theatre was packed as Geraldine Carton from Sustainable Fashion Dublin, DJ and influencer Tara Stewart, Genevieve Sann from Transparent Magazine and Dylan (Dread X) Chapman from ILL Hippie lined the stage.

The opening discussion focused on how each panel member first got into the area of sustainable fashion. Carton, the cofounder of Sustainable Fashion Dublin, was inspired to leave her job with a women’s magazine after questioning all aspects of the clothing production process. She co-created Sustainable Fashion Dublin as an initiative to promote the “positive, guilt-free aspect of sustainable fashion.”

For Stewart, while working unaware as an influencer for a fast-fashion clothing brand, she was put in contact with Sustainable Fashion Dublin and promptly ended her contract on moral grounds. “I love upcycling and making clothes that I like, making them work for me.”

Chapman began to look at men’s clothes differently when he was around sixteen years of age – the complete lack of catering for men’s fashion and ability to express themselves, especially in Ireland, encouraged him to get involved in slow fashion.

As for Sann, two years ago the Netflix documentary The True Cost (a documentary thrown around a lot throughout the evening) opened her eyes to the problem and inspired her to create her magazine, Transparent.

Many tips were given by the panellists throughout the course of the evening:

  1. Look at your own wardrobe and look at what you have, as we go through four times more clothes than our parents, and keep them for only half as long
  2. Swap clothes with your friends as they’ll more than likely have similar interests and styles
  3. Use apps like Pinterest for information on reworking something you have already or tailoring something you’ve found
  4. Use resources like Depop to buy used clothes but be careful that they are authentic and not just bulk-bought
  5. Buy local so you know exactly where your clothes are coming from and how they are made
  6. Attend Swapshops, like the one run by Sustainable Fashion Dublin
  7. Go to charity shops to both support the charities and keep it sustainable

An extra piece of advice is not to give to clothing banks. In fact, they give a lump sum of only three per cent to the represented charity of the huge figure they receive from textile recycling. Instead, Carlton recommends to donate directly to the charity shop, labelling bags as “sellable” and “recyclable”. This way, shops can gain seventy per cent of the figure from textile recycling.

Carlton also explained greenwashing. “When a brand promoting sustainability overemphasises how ‘good’ it is, it’s usually hiding its ‘worse’ things… 90% of the other clothes are being made in horrendous conditions.” For example, she revealed that the Aral Sea has actually decreased to one tenth of its size due to its water being taken to grow cotton plantations.

Stewart recommended “treating getting out of fast fashion as breaking a habit” – don’t shop while bored, unfollow certain influencers and within a few months even your ads on social media will change. Chapman emphasised the amount of resources available for self-education on the topic – “open your mind and engage with each other.” If retail therapy is your downfall, then find something else to replace it with.

As for the most important takeaway for each panellist, Stewart maintained that you should not beat yourself (or your friends!) up about sustainable fashion. Instead, “really see it in a more positive light”. Carlton mentioned elongating the lifespan of your own clothes and emphasised that sustainable fashion is not supposed to be regimental or boring. “It’s a way to express yourself, have fun and decrease your carbon footprint!” Chapman, the only male on the panel, said to be logical with your clothes – “do you really need to get that same shirt in a different colour?” Sann said to “just try your best, be critically minded, and don’t fall into greenwashing traps!”

Following a quick and easy DIY solution to one-use cotton pads by cutting up and sewing old towels and t-shirts, Carlton really summed up the whole atmosphere of the evening. “It’s not about a small amount of people being perfect, it’s about a huge amount of people making incremental changes.” No shaming or passive aggression was directed towards those who “shop fast” – in fact, many of the panellists themselves are only very recent converts to the world of fast fashion – just a sense of understanding. There was an emphasis on “doing your part” and just being positive about fashion overall.

 

 

Photo of the Slow Fashion Panel Discussion and Upcycling Masterclass by Shannon Takahashi, 

 

 

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The European Investment Bank’s decision to divest from fossil fuels

The European Investment Bank (EIB) recently announced that it would be phasing out investment in fossil fuel companies by 2021. The EIB is the biggest public lender globally and the move was celebrated by those within the banking industry and the environmental movement. It sends a clear message that markets are moving away from fossil fuels and towards renewable energies.

What is Ecofeminism?

Ecofeminism is a movement that unites two issues close to our hearts at STAND: women’s rights and the environment. It is perhaps one of the most useful ways we can look at a wide range of social issues we face today. However, the term may be unfamiliar to many.

‘We are the voice, we are the youth and we are the power’: Dublin students unleash rallying cry against the Government’s climate change inaction

The climate strike in Dublin marks the fourth global student strike, and yet the Irish Government has made little progress to show for it.

Climate Case Ireland launch an Appeal

Friday 22nd November marks the day that Climate Case Ireland lodged an appeal for the dismissal of their High Court case from January 2019. The coalition of members of Friends of the Irish Environment Ireland stated that an application has been made to both the Court of Appeal and the Supreme Court. The group must lie in wait to hear whether the Supreme Court will permit the hearing of their case at this time.

Fracked gas and climate action: an activist point of view

Fracked gas and climate action: an activist point of view

The last few weeks have seen an explosion in activity on the Irish climate activist movement. In the wake of the recent UN Climate Action Summit which took place in New York on September 23rd, the Irish government has faced ever increasing scrutiny from environmental activist groups and climate conscious citizens alike. STAND news sat down with Maeve O’Gorman, an activist from Not Here Not Anywhere (NHNA) to get her take on the current challenges activists are fighting for. 

Leo Varadkar’s UN Climate Summit address briefly went into the Irish government’s climate policy plans. The plans, the Taoiseach said, included halting fossil fuel exploration in the Irish seas while continuing to explore for natural gas as a transition fuel. He also said the country would ring-fence carbon tax to invest in renewable energy and to look after those who might be affected through unemployment by a developing green economy. 

However, the promises made by Leo were not deemed good enough by a majority of climate activists. 

“By saying ‘oh we’re not going to explore for oil in Ireland’, this is amazing, but then you peel back half a layer on that and it’s complete greenwashing! The ban on fracking is only effective for 80% of the Irish seas. All the existing licences will remain.’’ By allowing corporations to hold onto their licenses, the 20% of the Irish seas not included in the ban will continue to be exploited for oil, Maeve explained.

‘’The government needs to stop fossil fuel exploration and tell other countries to stop. We are creating a demand for fracking and fossil fuel exploration but we just don’t have time for that!”

The thorn in the sides of Not Here Not Anywhere is that while Leo Varadkar says that oil exploration won’t be happening in Ireland, they continue to outsource oil and gas, and even intend to import it from the U.S via a Liquified Natural Gas Terminal, planned to be constructed on the West coast of Ireland. Shannon LNG, as it is known, will be an import terminal for fracked gas from the US. The gas will be shipped from the US, stored here, and will then be redistributed to various countries in the EU.

The project has been a major cause of contention in the Dail recently as the development faced opposition from both citizens and TDs. Why is it such an issue? 

‘’There are environmental and health impacts from fracking. One of the main reasons we oppose it is that it is seen as a clean transition fuel that is less carbon intense. But actually when you frack for gas, it releases methane. Methane is at least 85 times more efficient at trapping heat in the atmosphere than CO2 released from burning coal. It is a dirty fossil fuel. The government banned fracking in Ireland but then go and import it and sell it as clean ‘’freedom fuel’’, said Maeve.

“All these wild claims being put out there that it is a clean energy are untrue. It is a fossil fuel. We know that 80% of fossil fuels needs to be kept in the ground in order to make sure we have any hope of stopping the climate warming to +1.5 degrees which will have catastrophic effects! Yet we are promoting exploration and use of fossil fuels abroad, and trying to hide it. What NHNA says is that  we need to be against fracking wherever it is happening in the world, not just in Ireland.”

Last week in the Dail, an emergency meeting was called to discuss the issue of the Shannon LNG project after uproar from citizens and environmental groups over the steamrolling of the development plan. The government had no plans on having a public debate on the issue, which was seen as completely undemocratic by several activist groups. The environmental groups made their concerns known and Richard Bruton, the current Minister for Communications, Climate Action and the Environment was forced to listen to statements from TDs opposing the plan. Only time will tell whether the concerns are taken seriously. 

 

For more information, visit Stop Shannon LNG.

 

 

Photo by @NHNAireland on Twitter

 

 

Watch out Maeve O’Gorman interview down below!