43 People Die In Factory Fire In New Delhi

43 People Die In Factory Fire In New Delhi

43 people have died as a result of a fire that broke out in a garment factory in New Delhi while 16 others are being treated for burns and smoke inhalation. 

The fire brigade received the call alerting them to the blaze at 05:22 local time on Sunday, 8th December (23:52 GMT on Saturday). The cause of the blaze is unknown but is thought to have been the result of an electrical short circuit. 

The workers died as a result of the inhalation of poisonous gases. They were sleeping in the factory between their shifts. They were being paid 150 rupees a day (€1.91) and working in extremely poor conditions. The factory, which mainly manufactured handbags, did not have a proper fire license and was operating illegally. The factory owner and manager have been arrested.  

The victims were mostly Muslim migrants from the impoverished border region of Bihar in eastern India. Barbar Ali, a family member of a woman who was rescued from the building, explained that the workers had to endure extremely poor conditions in the factory and they had been seeking better wages. “Their only fault was they were poor. Why else would someone work and sleep in such a congested place?” Mr Ali said

The Prime Minister of India has described the disaster as “extremely horrific” and offered his condolences to family members in a tweet.

It would appear that nothing has changed since the infamous collapse of the Rana Plaza garment factory in the Dhaka District of Bangladesh in 2013, in which 1,134 people were killed. After this devastating event brands and trade unions signed the Bangladesh Accord, which was intended to regulate the safety of working conditions in these factories by means of inspection. 

However, the garment industry remains dangerous and exploitative. According to the 2015 documentary The True Cost, of the 40 million people who work in the garment industry only 2% are paid a living wage.  Not only are illegal factories with substandard working conditions in operation, but workers in these factories suffer abuse. 

80% of garment workers are women, but the vast majority of factory managers are men, while women occupy low-level positions in factories – a structure which often leads to gender-based abuse. Global Labour Justice published a report last year which gave an overview of gender-based violence which occurs in the factories of H&M, one of the most popular fast fashion brands in the world. 

The reality is that these brands outsource the manufacture of their products to such an extent that it becomes nearly impossible to regulate. On top of that, there is no incentive for them to look into the working conditions in their factories or offer garment workers a living wage while there is no accountability and their profit margins remain so high. 

Today, people are becoming increasingly aware of ethics and sustainability when it comes to fashion, and fast fashion brands are beginning to feel the pressure. We as consumers have to be able to tell the difference between when a brand is actually being ethical, or when they are simply slapping a word like “conscious” on to a product in an attempt to appear ethical without providing an explanation of what that means to them. To put it plainly, if a brand is not transparent about their means of production, it’s probably because they would rather you didn’t know. 

That is why it is increasingly important that we shop consciously. This can start with something as simple as asking ourselves who makes the clothes we wear, and why their exploitation should feed our consumerism. The devastating case of this New Delhi factory which has burned down is not unique. In most cases, the people who make our clothes work in similar conditions, and risk their lives every day in order to make a wage which they can’t even survive on. We have been given the privilege of a consumer vote, and with it comes the responsibility to exercise it correctly.

 

Picture: DiplomatTesterMan 

 

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Five Humanitarian Hotspots 2020

As 2020 begins it is clear that the global humanitarian overview is worsening. As such, here are five coming inflection points that will undoubtedly shape the humanitarian context for 2020 and beyond.

Holiday Humanity: Celbridge Community Comes Together

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Vancouver: Harmony for Indigenous and Urban Life?

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What Do You Know About Direct Provision?

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Could Community Sponsorship be the Answer to Refugee Integration in Ireland?

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Aung San Suu Kyi Denies Genocide at the International Criminal Court

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UNCHR’s impact in war-torn Libya?

UNCHR’s impact in war-torn Libya?

Recent investigations from Euronews into the work of the United Nations Refugee Agency, the UNHCR, in Libya has revealed a culture of neglect. The UNHCR, which claims it can only register asylum seekers and refugees  originating from Iraq, Syria, Palestine, Sudan, South Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Yemen and Somalia, is under fire by human rights activists for its operations in the Northern African state. The UN successfully brokered the Libyan Political Agreement in 2015, but since then militias have remained at battle across the state. 

The UNHCR’s mandate is to find a safe solution for refugees. Therefore, the UNHCR’s main mission in Libya is to register people as refugees and find a solution to evacuate these people out of the country and into a safe space. The EU Trust Fund for Africa counts on the UNHCR to ensure that asylum procedures and policies are in line with human rights standards. 

Many refugees and migrants seeking asylum end up in militia-run detention centres with little to no help from the UNHCR. Since September 2018, six detention centres in Libya have been involved in militia clashes, causing refugees and migrants detained to  seek safety again. Abdelnaser Mbarah Ezam, a Captain at the Ministry of the Interior, Government of National Accord in Libya told Euronews that many migrants in these centres are suffering from depression after believing that registering with the UNHCR would guarantee them acceptance into Europe. 

Euronews spoke directly with many refugees who witnessed and suffered human rights atrocities in these camps, while registered with the UNHCR. Testimonies included instances of abuse, torture and extortion. Libyan coastguards automatically re-incarcerate anyone found trying to cross the Mediterrean, due to provisions under an EU and Libyan agreement signed in 2017. One detention centre, Zintan, reported 700 human beings crammed in one room  without access to adequate food or water. This included approx 120 minors. Since September 2018, twenty-two people in the centre have died of TB. 

Protests at Zintan in June 2019 have included refugees showing banners  stating “We are victims by UNHCR in Libya” and “We are abused by a human rights organisation”.

A whistleblower who previously worked for Libya’s UNHCR agency told Euronews that the UNCHR resembled “ an agency overstretched and out of its depth, with asylum seekers left homeless, deprived of medical care and in legal limbo in an increasingly violent and unstable Libya”. The whistleblower also detailed cases of UNCHR staff accepting bribes from refugees in a (failed) effort to speed up their asylum claims. Additionally, an internal audit found that the UNHCR in Libya  had purchased laptops at inflated prices (eight laptops for just under $50,000) and spent almost $200,000 on flights without making use of competitive bidding. 

According to Euronews, refugees were paying money to get inside the UNHCR’s Gathering and Departure Facility (GDF) in Tripoli.  One refugee awaiting evacuation explained: “The guards who are working at the gate, brought inside Somalian and Eritrean women; they paid 2000 dinars (around 430€) each. We told this to UNHCR, and they asked us not to tell anyone.”

Investigations like this one in Libya should lead to government action and justice for the victims impacted.

 

Photo by Magharebia on Flickr

 

Browse more stories below or sign up to our newsletter to receive our top news straight to your inbox!

Five Humanitarian Hotspots 2020

As 2020 begins it is clear that the global humanitarian overview is worsening. As such, here are five coming inflection points that will undoubtedly shape the humanitarian context for 2020 and beyond.

Holiday Humanity: Celbridge Community Comes Together

In Ireland, one-third of people over the age of 65 live alone – or 399,815 people – according to the 2016 Census. One community in Kildare decided to take action by bringing people together in celebration on Christmas day. With the help of many local residents, 70 people spent this important holiday with plentiful food and fun.

Vancouver: Harmony for Indigenous and Urban Life?

In Vancouver, plans have been unveiled to rebuild a reserve for Squamish peoples – indigenous people of the Pacific Northwest Coast. The new district will be built over an original Squamish area in downtown Vancouver which was destroyed over a century ago by Canadian officials.

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Could Community Sponsorship be the Answer to Refugee Integration in Ireland?

Community Sponsorship is a pathway to resettlement that involves refugees being welcomed directly into a community by a group of people who have committed to helping them settle in and integrate. One group who have made this commitment are the St Luke’s Welcomes group in Cork City who realised they all shared a desire to act regarding the ongoing refugee crisis.

Aung San Suu Kyi Denies Genocide at the International Criminal Court

In the realm of international politics, few world leaders have incited such hope and then despair as Myanmar’s president Aung San Suu Kyi. Amidst allegations of genocide against the treatment of Myanmar’s Rohingya population, Suu Kyi has been summoned to the International Court of Justice to answer for her nation’s transgressions.

What is Russia doing in Africa?

What is Russia doing in Africa?

On October 23rd and 24th, Russia hosted representatives from all 54 African countries at the first ever Russia-Africa summit, with the aim of improving partnership and trade links. Putin, the Russian president,  pulled out all the stops as host, and after the summit, announced that 12.5 million dollars worth of trade deals had been discussed. This event shows that Russia is clearly seeking to further its influence in Africa. But why is Russia so interested in improving ties with African states?

During the Cold War, the Soviet Union was an influential player in Africa, supporting many liberation movements and providing financial aid to regimes, often with the aim of antagonising the United States and promoting communism. However, since the fall of the Soviet Union, Moscow’s influence on the continent has waned. Now, Vladimir Putin wants to bring it back.

There are several reasons why Russia wants to revive its power in Africa. The first is the desire to gain back what the Soviet Union once had. Russia wishes to be seen as a great power that can compete with the US and China on a global stage – for example, Russia may be interested in increasing its leverage over African countries to affect power dynamics in the United Nations. In 2014, 29 African states voted against or abstained from a UN resolution condemning Russia’s illegal annexation of Crimea in the Ukraine. This demonstrates that   increasing its power and sway can lead to clear benefits for Russia. The latter is also extending its power in the Middle East, evidenced by its involvement in the Syrian conflict. Similarly Russia has meddled in elections in multiple countries, including the United States and the United Kingdom. 

‘All of these attempts to increase the number of countries in Russia’s sphere of influence signal its desire to exert more power globally and be taken seriously as a global player. One thing that helps Russia in this quest is that some African leaders are attracted to Russia over the US and Europe, due to the lack of conditions attached to Russian aid and trade. While more liberal countries are often wary of making deals with African leaders accused of human rights violations or misuse of funds, Russia, as well as China, is happy to provide help for those leaders, and uses that to its advantage. China has massively increased its involvement with Africa in recent years, while the United States has pulled back. These provide both an incentive and an opportunity for Russia to step in.

Aside from improving its status, there are some material benefits Russia can gain from increasing its relations with Africa. Russia is currently the largest exporter of weapons to Africa and the recent Summit suggests that increased trade links are on the Russian agenda. However, its overall trade with Africa remains small compared to some other countries. There is a lot of room for Russia to potentially expand the amount of weapons it exports to African countries. Furthermore, there are lots of potential business opportunities for Russian companies in Africa, especially in the energy sector. Many Russian state-owned energy firms already have contracts with African countries and are looking to increase these. Russian mining companies also stand to benefit from the rich mineral resources of many African countries. Additionally, Putin has stated that he would like to see an increase in Russian non-military exports to Africa, such as the food export sector.

As well as being involved in trade and aid in Africa, Putin has also increased Russia’s military involvement there, with Russian soldiers being active in several countries, including the Central African Republic and Libya. While many of these soldiers work for private military groups rather than the Russian government, their presence could be helpful for Putin in boosting the reputation of Russia among African countries where those mercenaries work for government forces. These military ties may be increasing soon, as Russia seems to be in talks with the Central African Republic to open its first African military base. This move could have been spurred on by the increased presence of the Chinese military in Africa, who have a military base in Djibouti. The United States also has three bases in Africa. Therefore, if Russia really wants to seem on the same level as these countries it may need to open its own base.

Overall, it seems that increasing its presence in Africa fits into Russia’s strategy of trying to project more power globally in order to challenge the US and China. It will attempt to achieve this by increasing its military and political sway in Africa, as well as hoping to improve its own waning economy by increasing trade with African nations. It remains to be seen exactly what effects this will have on Africa. It could lead to economic gains, but given Putin’s support for dictators and his habit of  turning a blind eye to human rights abuses, if Russia’s influence comes at the expense of that of more liberal countries, it could lead to further entrenchment of these abuses in many countries.

 

Photo by @KremlinRussia_E on Twitter

 

Browse more stories below or sign up to our newsletter to receive our top news straight to your inbox!

Five Humanitarian Hotspots 2020

As 2020 begins it is clear that the global humanitarian overview is worsening. As such, here are five coming inflection points that will undoubtedly shape the humanitarian context for 2020 and beyond.

Holiday Humanity: Celbridge Community Comes Together

In Ireland, one-third of people over the age of 65 live alone – or 399,815 people – according to the 2016 Census. One community in Kildare decided to take action by bringing people together in celebration on Christmas day. With the help of many local residents, 70 people spent this important holiday with plentiful food and fun.

Vancouver: Harmony for Indigenous and Urban Life?

In Vancouver, plans have been unveiled to rebuild a reserve for Squamish peoples – indigenous people of the Pacific Northwest Coast. The new district will be built over an original Squamish area in downtown Vancouver which was destroyed over a century ago by Canadian officials.

What Do You Know About Direct Provision?

As the 2020 General Election is fast approaching, why not test your knowledge on one of Ireland’s biggest human rights issues of the last two decades; Direct Provision. Brush up on your facts and figures so you can quiz your local candidates and help keep Direct Provision at the front of the new Dáil’s minds!

Could Community Sponsorship be the Answer to Refugee Integration in Ireland?

Community Sponsorship is a pathway to resettlement that involves refugees being welcomed directly into a community by a group of people who have committed to helping them settle in and integrate. One group who have made this commitment are the St Luke’s Welcomes group in Cork City who realised they all shared a desire to act regarding the ongoing refugee crisis.

Aung San Suu Kyi Denies Genocide at the International Criminal Court

In the realm of international politics, few world leaders have incited such hope and then despair as Myanmar’s president Aung San Suu Kyi. Amidst allegations of genocide against the treatment of Myanmar’s Rohingya population, Suu Kyi has been summoned to the International Court of Justice to answer for her nation’s transgressions.

Samantha Power’s Book Review: The Ideal Woman for the Job

Samantha Power’s Book Review: The Ideal Woman for the Job

On one of the rainiest days of this rainy season, Samantha Power arrived at her home city of Dublin and was greeted in Trinity College Dublin’s Regent’s House to rapturous applause. Maybe it’s because of her Irish roots, or maybe it’s her warm and affable nature, but there is a real sense of pride for Power’s achievements in the room. The students who managed to secure tickets are upright, hoping to imbibe some of her career secrets. 

I have not long finished reading Power’s political memoir The Education of an Idealist, which tells the story of her incredible career to date. After emigrating to Pittsburgh from Dublin at the age of 9, Power attended Yale before becoming a war correspondent, based in Croatia and Bosnia during the Siege of Sarajevo. After her journalism and research won her a Pulitzer Prize, she taught at Harvard Law School and Harvard Kennedy School. In 2006, she joined Barack Obama, then a newly elected Congressman, as an advisor. Soon, Power left Harvard to work with Obama on his election campaign, and when he became President of the United States, worked as his Human Rights Advisor for his first term and as the United States Ambassador to the UN from 2013-2017. 

Although Power is perhaps best known for her government career in diplomacy, it is her staunch moral compass and dedication to humanitarian issues which have underpinned her career, and do so again in her memoir. She writes about how witnessing the Tiananmen Square protests as a nineteen year-old completely swerved her career path. Some of the most colourful sections of the book come from her time as a freelance journalist during the Balkan war, and the close-calls she faced in trying to help victims. She campaigned for victims in Darfur and spent time on the ground in West Africa at the height of the Ebola crisis in 2014.

Much of The Education of an Idealist centres on the tensions between acting on human suffering and the bureaucracy that dictates government action. This is especially climactic in the ten days in August 2013 after the news of a suspected chemical weapons attack in Damascus, Syria, broke, where the Obama administration had to decide whether to respond with military intervention. The nitty-gritty scenes in the White House Situation Room, and Power’s rallying cry to Obama to respond in honour of the suspected 1,429 dead from this one attack, reads like a thriller novel but with all the more poignancy, because it raises questions about what could have happened in Syria in the ensuing years if Obama had intervened (or at the very least, asks the reader to consider if he was right to not intervene). Power is asked during her interview in Trinity College Dublin whether she believes one can achieve more progress through activism or government, and while she pays homage to both forms of action, she is loyal to the achievements possible in a government structure.  

Overall, The Education of an Idealist is a political memoir with heart. Power does not attempt to use the platform as political ammo to prop up the decisions of Obama’s administration, nor does she use it in a game of one-upmanship against those she has disagreed with throughout her career. Instead, Power offers a warm, candid and gripping read. She tells her story her way, with a touch of self-deprecating humour which feels quite uniquely Irish. 

Standing in line for Power to sign my dog-eared copy of her book, I am struck by the nerves in my stomach. I tell her of my time in Sarajevo this summer, and how I especially enjoyed her descriptions of the camaraderie between correspondents there.  The ambience in the room is one of hope for a safer and better future, of political stability and action on climate change, and so it feels particularly fitting when I realise she has signed my copy ‘With hope, Samantha Power’.

 

Picture by Gerald R. Ford school on Flickr

 

Browse more stories below or sign up to our newsletter to receive our top news straight to your inbox!

Five Humanitarian Hotspots 2020

As 2020 begins it is clear that the global humanitarian overview is worsening. As such, here are five coming inflection points that will undoubtedly shape the humanitarian context for 2020 and beyond.

Celebrate Chinese New Year in Dublin with DCNYF

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Holiday Humanity: Celbridge Community Comes Together

In Ireland, one-third of people over the age of 65 live alone – or 399,815 people – according to the 2016 Census. One community in Kildare decided to take action by bringing people together in celebration on Christmas day. With the help of many local residents, 70 people spent this important holiday with plentiful food and fun.

Vancouver: Harmony for Indigenous and Urban Life?

In Vancouver, plans have been unveiled to rebuild a reserve for Squamish peoples – indigenous people of the Pacific Northwest Coast. The new district will be built over an original Squamish area in downtown Vancouver which was destroyed over a century ago by Canadian officials.

Yet Again, Love Island Is Failing Us On Diversity

The January blues may be in full swing but over on ITV2, love is in the air with the arrival of the very first winter season of Love Island. Although you cannot fault the extremely popular reality show on its entertainment value, it has come under scrutiny time and time again for its lack of body diversity, lack of racial representation and heteronormativity – this season is no exception.

What Do You Know About Direct Provision?

As the 2020 General Election is fast approaching, why not test your knowledge on one of Ireland’s biggest human rights issues of the last two decades; Direct Provision. Brush up on your facts and figures so you can quiz your local candidates and help keep Direct Provision at the front of the new Dáil’s minds!

The kurdish: a history

The kurdish: a history

To help you understand the recent military attacks against the Kurdish population at the Syrian border, STAND News takes a look back at the history of the Islamic ethnic group.

It is difficult to underestimate the bitter history of the Kurds, an Irianian ethnic group of approximately 36 million people living mostly in various regions of the Middle East – namely Turkey, Iran, Iraq and Syria. About 25% of the Kurd population currently live in western Turkey, while up to 15% live in northern Syria. This Islamic minority have once more held front pages across the world after Trump’s White House stood back to allow Turkey to launch attacks on their former allies at the Syrian border, displacing over 130,000 Kurds in just a few days. 

The Kurdish people have been stateless since the 1800s, with the closest resemblance of Kurdistan borders being considered after World War I. Since then, Kurdish kingdoms have been crushed by Iraqi, British and French forces. They faced genocide from Iranian forces in the 1980s during Reagan’s office, and fought for thirty-five years in a guerrilla war against Turkey. 

Since 2014, Kurdish fighters took control of key cities in Syria to defend them from a rising Islamic State. The Kurdish population of Syria have long been vocal about their infringed human rights in the country, staging the Rojava revolution to establish the Democratic Federation of Northern Syria in 2016 – an area deemed to have a social revolution of democratic confederalism. In doing so, they have fostered a growing allyship with the United States, which alarmed Turkey, 

By standing back and allowing Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan to send his army into northern Syria, Trump has bitterly betrayed those who were once the US’s most purposeful allies in the fight against the Islamic State. Rallies have taken place across Europe over the weekend – including in Dublin – to protest against Trump’s action, and to encourage alliance with Sweden’s plans to embargo weapons with Turkey at an upcoming EU summit. 

 

 

Photo by Hilary Ellary on Twitter

 

 

Browse more stories below or sign up to our newsletter to receive our top news straight to your inbox!

Five Humanitarian Hotspots 2020

As 2020 begins it is clear that the global humanitarian overview is worsening. As such, here are five coming inflection points that will undoubtedly shape the humanitarian context for 2020 and beyond.

Holiday Humanity: Celbridge Community Comes Together

In Ireland, one-third of people over the age of 65 live alone – or 399,815 people – according to the 2016 Census. One community in Kildare decided to take action by bringing people together in celebration on Christmas day. With the help of many local residents, 70 people spent this important holiday with plentiful food and fun.

Vancouver: Harmony for Indigenous and Urban Life?

In Vancouver, plans have been unveiled to rebuild a reserve for Squamish peoples – indigenous people of the Pacific Northwest Coast. The new district will be built over an original Squamish area in downtown Vancouver which was destroyed over a century ago by Canadian officials.

What Do You Know About Direct Provision?

As the 2020 General Election is fast approaching, why not test your knowledge on one of Ireland’s biggest human rights issues of the last two decades; Direct Provision. Brush up on your facts and figures so you can quiz your local candidates and help keep Direct Provision at the front of the new Dáil’s minds!

Could Community Sponsorship be the Answer to Refugee Integration in Ireland?

Community Sponsorship is a pathway to resettlement that involves refugees being welcomed directly into a community by a group of people who have committed to helping them settle in and integrate. One group who have made this commitment are the St Luke’s Welcomes group in Cork City who realised they all shared a desire to act regarding the ongoing refugee crisis.

Aung San Suu Kyi Denies Genocide at the International Criminal Court

In the realm of international politics, few world leaders have incited such hope and then despair as Myanmar’s president Aung San Suu Kyi. Amidst allegations of genocide against the treatment of Myanmar’s Rohingya population, Suu Kyi has been summoned to the International Court of Justice to answer for her nation’s transgressions.

The Fixable Fact of Homelessness in Ireland

The Fixable Fact of Homelessness in Ireland

By July 28 this year, the homeless population of Ireland reached a staggering 10,275. The number of homeless families has increased by 178 per cent since June 2015, with more than a 1000 per cent rise in the number of families becoming homeless every month since 2011. This astronomical number does not even include “hidden homelessness” – people living in squats, staying indefinitely with friends, those in domestic violence refuges or even those who are sleeping rough. The official rough sleep account in Dublin in April 2019 was 128 people.

For Focus Ireland Director of Advocacy Mike Allen, the solution to homelessness is clear – more social housing and more affordable rental accommodation. But is it quite that simple? Maybe it is.

Of course structural factors are prominent in the direct causes of homelessness. One cannot deny the effects of the housing market – people are being pushed out of their homes due to high rents, landlords selling up and an overall shortage of properties to rent at all. In some cases, life’s circumstances such as mental illness, relationship breakdowns or addiction, can cause people and families to become homeless quite suddenly. However it may be submitted that there is something more fundamentally flawed that remains rooted in the people that have the power to change things.

Every person in Ireland is painfully aware of the horrors of homelessness . Those growing up in Dublin especially have grown grossly accustomed to the sight of homeless people, or young children going to school out of bed-and-breakfasts, or students crashing on their friend’s couches as they cannot afford their rent at the moment. It is a sure sign of something inherently wrong when these statements simply don’t faze anyone anymore.

While the stark figure of 10,000 homeless seems daunting and unapproachable, the solution is just within our grasp. A solution to the every-growing “Homelessness Crisis” is perhaps not as distant as we perceive. So why is the government making no visible effort to tackle the issue in any tangible way? There is certainly a stigmatised view of the cycle relating to homelessness – a slight feeling that perhaps these people put themselves in this position and we should leave it up to them to remove themselves of it, one of those phenomena that is terrible in theory but bizarrely appears to be acceptable in practice through a warped sense of victim-blaming. However, a dehumanised approach to homelessness will hardly solve the urgent crisis at hand. The small and incremental actions that are currently being taken are almost insignificant compared to the rapid rate of the growth of homelessness right now.

Greta Thunberg has recently emerged as a global leader, working diligently to combat climate change. Yet her discourse is undeniably appropriate in a discussion on homelessness. At the UN Climate Action Summit, though referring to a very different topic, she stresses: “You say you hear us and that you understand the urgency. But no matter how sad and angry I am, I do not want to believe that. Because if you really understood the situation and still kept on failing to act, then you would be evil. And that I refuse to believe.”

Amidst a disheartening crisis, it is essential that the public maintains hope and focuses on working toward the solution, not the problem at hand. Focus Ireland has provided some recommended figures earlier this year – €400 million to deliver 2,000 social homes in addition to 7,716 homes in 2020, the approval of a €1.3 billion borrowing capacity to finance 6,500 new social homes by 2021, an “innovate homeless prevention” fund of €500,000 and €250,000 to fund mediation services. They also recommend a vacant home tax to return units back into the “active housing supply”, the provision of Case Managers and Family support teams, the restoration of domestic violence services, an increase of Rent Supplement and Housing Assistance Payments. Ireland’s rainy day fund, which will be worth approximately €2 billion by the end of next year, would more than cover this. And I cannot think of a better cause for these funds than the eradication of homelessness, once and for all.

 

 

Photo by Ev on Unsplash

 

Want to learn more about how the housing crisis is impacting students in Ireland? Listen to the STAND Student Podcast – Episode 1

 

 

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FGM: A Multifarious Practice Deeply Ingrained in Somalia

While FGM is frequently justified as a religious practice preserving the purity of women, it is, in reality, an extremely resilient customary practice which predates the conception and arrival to the Horn of Africa of Islam.

Students in Action: A Stem of Hope for Sinead

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