Unacceptable Status Quo in Accessing Abortion Services in Ireland

Unacceptable Status Quo in Accessing Abortion Services in Ireland

The 2018 referendum – which repealed the oppressive Eighth Amendment to the Constitution and allowed room for the government to legislate for abortion access – came following years of grassroots activism and campaigning. But what is the status quo regarding access to abortion services in Ireland? STAND investigates. 

Abortion in Ireland is now regulated by the Health (Regulation of Termination of Pregnancy) Bill 2018 which provides the legislative framework for the provision of abortion services in defined circumstances. The framework draws on the recommendations of the 2017 Citizen’s Assembly and the Joint Oireachtas Committee. Both groups recommended that termination of pregnancy should be permitted ‘with no restriction to reason’ up to 12 weeks’ gestation age. This is in line with the laws of other countries such as France, Finland and Germany. After the 12-week gestation the Bill permits termination in cases of risk to life, of serious risk to health, or fatal foetal abnormality. 

The criterion of “serious” risk to health has been denounced by groups such as Amnesty International and the Irish Council for Civil Liberties as it puts the onus on doctors to determine whether the risk is severe enough. This puts doctors in a difficult position, making them more likely to err on the side of caution. Other issues include the fact that abortion services are provided free of charge to Republic of Ireland residents but not to women from Northern Ireland (as many groups had campaigned for). A 3-day waiting period between initial consultation and the termination procedure was also inserted into the Bill despite protests from activists. 

The continued criminalisation of terminations outside of the current framework is one of the biggest agenda items for abortion rights activists as – although the 2018 Bill does not criminalise women procuring abortions for themselves – it states that it is an offence for a person to carry out or assist in carrying out a termination outside of the provisions of the Bill. Amnesty International Ireland (whose original abortion rights campaign in 2015 was titled ‘She is Not a Criminal’, focussing on the inhumane nature of the 14-year jail sentences placed on women accessing illegal abortions in Ireland) has condemned this continued criminalisation. This 14-year jail sentence continues to loom over doctors who are deciding whether there is a “serious” risk to the health of the mother, or if a foetal anomaly is fatal. Linda Kavanagh from the Abortion Rights Campaign stressed that women who qualified for terminations in Ireland were still being forced to travel ‘due to overly cautious interpretations of the law from doctors fearing criminal sanctions’. In November 2018, Dáil Eireann voted on the possibility of decriminalisation but this proposal was defeated. Minister Simon Harris claimed that continued criminalisation was necessary from a policy perspective and that removing it may put the life or health of women at risk. 

The mandatory three-day waiting period between the initial GP consultation and the termination is an aspect of the Irish legislation which falls short of international human rights law. It puts some of the most vulnerable women in a difficult position when they are trying to procure abortion services. The Irish Council for Civil Liberties characterised this mandatory waiting period as an ‘unnecessary restriction on safe access to abortion [that] reinforces patriarchal notions of women as incapable of making decisions regarding their own health’. It also highlights how this will have the most impact on people in abusive relationships, those who live in remote areas or in Direct Provision centres, disabled people and those who struggle to pay for two separate doctors’ appointments. In June 2019, the National Women’s Council of Ireland (NWCI) raised concerns about these barriers to access for those in vulnerable or complicated situations, as well as concerns around delays in “buffer-zone” legislation. Dr Cliona Loughnane of the NWCI highlighted the ‘institutional conscientious objection’ which can be seen in places such as Kilkenny and which the government promised would not be the case. She also calls for urgency in passing buffer-zone legislation to protect women and their doctors. In many cases, particularly in rural areas, the inability to access abortion services privately and without exposure to protestors is enough to force some women to travel to the UK.

One of the Together For Yes slogans seen on billboards across Ireland during the lead up to the referendum stated ‘sometimes a private matter needs public support’. Although in theory Ireland now has legislation allowing for abortion services, in practice there is still much to be done to ensure access to these services is a reality for every single person capable of becoming pregnant in this country.

 

 

Photo by Together for Yes on Facebook

 

 

Browse more stories below or sign up to our newsletter to receive our top news straight to your inbox!

Book Review: “Yes, We Still Drink Coffee!”

“Yes, We Still Drink Coffee!” is a collection of powerful essays, interspersed with beautiful illustrations, that tell the stories of female human rights defenders from Egypt, Kuwait, Palestine, Tunisia, Turkey, Somalia and Sudan. Behind each story is a meeting of two women. Here is our review.

What is Ecofeminism?

Ecofeminism is a movement that unites two issues close to our hearts at STAND: women’s rights and the environment. It is perhaps one of the most useful ways we can look at a wide range of social issues we face today. However, the term may be unfamiliar to many.

Endometriosis Explained

Endometriosis affects one in every 10 women in Ireland. Carrying a huge personal and social cost. Despite this, awareness of endometriosis is sorely lacking. This STAND article aims to spread awareness of this chronic condition.

New Focus on Gender in Ireland’s Citizens’ Assembly

Ireland’s Citizens’ Assembly is shifting its focus to gender equality. Over the next six months, it will examine issues like the gender pay gap, sexual assault and how to increase women’s participation in business and politics.

Witches – a History of Misogyny

On this All-Hallows Eve, witches will be painting the town black. But while witches continue to fascinate as feminist symbols, the history of the witch is also bound up with a history of misogyny that still persists today.

Abortion and gay marriage: change is coming in Northern Ireland

Yesterday, a plenary session was held in Stormont, Northern Ireland’s Assembly. The Assembly, which has not sat in over a thousand days, was brought back together to try and vote about the decriminalisation of abortion and the legalisation of same sex marriage.

The true cost of period shame

The true cost of period shame

The commercialisation of women’s sanitary products has contributed to the unhelpful notion that a period is inherently wrong in some vague, grimy sense. This completely natural experience is presented as strictly ‘women’s business’; something which must remain private and exclusive to the individual – and which must be hidden from society at all costs. It is a problem urgently requiring a solution.

In a recent commercial campaign for period products, the Australian company Libra was criticised after their depiction of menstruation was deemed ‘distasteful and unnecessary’ by some viewers. The offending advertisement depicted menstrual blood running down the legs of a woman showering, a used sanitary pad, and a visual demonstration of the pads’ absorbency. More than 600 formal complaints were made to the ad standards authority stating that the advertisement was ‘vulgar’ and ‘extremely offensive’. However, these complaints were swiftly dismissed, with the campaign gaining praise for its attempts to fight period taboos. The advertisement has raised questions regarding the dialogue that presently surrounds periods.

Period shame attaches itself to women and girls for many reasons. Symptoms associated with menstruation include nausea, back pain, vomiting and headaches. Such symptoms have forced girls to miss school with recent Irish studies carried out by Plan International showing 61% of girls are too embarrassed to discuss their periods. A further 88% of girls feel less capable of paying attention in class during their period. Similar research by Plan International is being carried out on a global scale. Results in India show that 20% of girls living in rural areas will leave school once they get their first period. In Malawi, 70% of girls miss 1 to 3 days of school a month due to their periods. These results highlight the injustices, embarrassment, shame and unnecessary challenges girls must contend with when faced with a natural bodily occurrence – and they illustrate how period shame is a serious barrier to the educational experience of girls all over the world. 

Other barriers to attending school during one’s period can be associated with the cost of sanitary products. In Ireland the average annual cost of sanitary products is estimated at €132. This price does not include the cost for pain relief such as painkillers. The cost also fails to include any new underwear that may need to be purchased when leakages occur and underwear is soiled from blood. Campaigns such as Free Periods in the UK aim to tackle the cost associated with menstruation. The goal of this campaign is to ensure that no girl has to miss another day of school due to the cost of sanitary products. Similarly, the charity Homeless Period fundraises money and takes donations of sanitary products for homeless women across Ireland and the UK. 

In recent days, the Free Period organizer Amika George has started a new campaign called Free Period Stories. The campaign aims to end the embarrassment and shame that surrounds periods and to open a dialogue surrounding menstruation. 

Free Period, Homeless Period and the ad campaign run by Libra all serve a vital role in combating the damaging implications of period taboos.  

 

To find out more about these issues – and to join in the menstruation conversation – you can visit: https://www.freeperiods.org/ & http://thehomelessperiod.com/

 

 

Photo by Marco Verch on Flickr.

 

 

Browse more stories below or sign up to our newsletter to receive our top news straight to your inbox!

Book Review: “Yes, We Still Drink Coffee!”

“Yes, We Still Drink Coffee!” is a collection of powerful essays, interspersed with beautiful illustrations, that tell the stories of female human rights defenders from Egypt, Kuwait, Palestine, Tunisia, Turkey, Somalia and Sudan. Behind each story is a meeting of two women. Here is our review.

What is Ecofeminism?

Ecofeminism is a movement that unites two issues close to our hearts at STAND: women’s rights and the environment. It is perhaps one of the most useful ways we can look at a wide range of social issues we face today. However, the term may be unfamiliar to many.

Endometriosis Explained

Endometriosis affects one in every 10 women in Ireland. Carrying a huge personal and social cost. Despite this, awareness of endometriosis is sorely lacking. This STAND article aims to spread awareness of this chronic condition.

New Focus on Gender in Ireland’s Citizens’ Assembly

Ireland’s Citizens’ Assembly is shifting its focus to gender equality. Over the next six months, it will examine issues like the gender pay gap, sexual assault and how to increase women’s participation in business and politics.

How the Breakthrough Case in Women’s Rights Set us Back Instead

How the Breakthrough Case in Women’s Rights Set us Back Instead

There is constant talk today in Ireland of vindicating the rights of women by striking out that controversial provision in Article 41.2 of Bunreacht na hÉireann (the Irish Constitution). S 2.1° of the article states that “In particular, the state recognises that by her life within the home, woman gives to the State a support without which the common good cannot be achieved” while s 2.2° states that “The state shall, therefore, endeavour to ensure that mothers shall not be obliged by economic necessity to engage in labour to the neglect of their duties in the home”.
Many people hold that this method of recognising women’s rights by tackling the provisions of the Constitution began (and succeeded) in the case of McGee v Attorney General – however, I argue that the true result of this case actually decelerated the cause for Irish women.

The landmark case of McGee v Attorney General [1973] IR 284 illustrates an unprecedented breakthrough in the area of family planning in Ireland and tells the story of May McGee, a young wife in financial difficulty whose health was in danger after four pregnancies.

Mrs McGee’s doctor prescribed her contraception from London which she attempted to import but it was seized by customs officials, as it was illegal in Ireland at the time to sell, offer, advertise or import contraceptives. She sought a declaration that the Criminal Law (Amendment) Act 1935, (under which she had been threatened by the Revenue Commission) was unconstitutional. Mrs McGee claimed the law that prevented her from bringing contraceptives into the State infringed the implied right to privacy guaranteed to all citizens under Article 40. She also argued that under Article 41, the importation ban violated the “inalienable” rights of the family in attempting to frustrate a decision made by Mrs McGee and her husband for the benefit of the family as a whole. It was also disputed that the law violated her freedom of conscience, with all claims denied by the Attorney General. Judge O’Keefe dismissed her case, but when Mrs McGee took her appeal to the Supreme Court in November 1973, she won decisively by a 4-1 margin. Judges Walsh, Budd, Henchy and Griffin all found that the act breached her constitutional right to marital privacy.

This judgment divided the nation. On one side, the anti-contraception campaigner Desmond Broadberry deemed it a “sad day for Ireland” and Catholic bishops reiterated that contraception was “morally wrong”. On the other side, the Family Planning Clinic in Dublin saw it as a “big breakthrough”. The Supreme Court was decisively ahead of public opinion and politicians on contraception. However, only a decade later was the anti-abortion amendment added to the Constitution. How did this happen?

It is crucial to note that the majority of judges did not condemn the law banning the use of contraceptives – they simply based their decision on the right to marital privacy implied in the Constitution. Judge Walsh specifically referenced Article 41, detailed above, which is currently receiving some media coverage for its comments on the family and, in particular, the role of women within the family. This clause has come under criticism with many campaigning for a referendum to either change this wording or strike out the Article altogether for its disregard to women’s rights. In a similar vein, although referring most likely to S 3.1° (ie. the state’s pledge to guard the institution of marriage with special care and to protect it against attack) the Supreme Court again seems to only superficially support women’s rights (just as in S 2, which while appearing to consolidate women’s rights is instead incredibly limiting). May McGee won her court case, but not because she was in danger of dying, not because the Supreme Court found the ban on her importation of contraceptives unconstitutional, not because as a woman in Ireland she deserved her right to this healthcare. May McGee won her court case not because she was May McGee, but because she was Mrs McGee. In this way the court case was, according to Ivana Bacik, “a catalyst for the pro-life amendment campaign”.

May McGee’s case is the pinnacle of paradoxical finding and possibly the most important Supreme Court case in Ireland. Although it accelerated women’s rights in Ireland to a huge extent, it had a detrimental effect in setting them back too.

 

 

Photo by Steve Johnson on Unsplash

 

Browse more stories below or sign up to our newsletter to receive our top news straight to your inbox!

Queen of England going “fur-free” is a step in the right direction

We’ve learnt it from Angela Kelly, Senior Dresser of Queen Elizabeth II of England: The Queen is going fur-free. By “going faux”, The Queen is setting a strong example and sending a powerful message, encouraging an ethical fashion trend that we should all follow. But we have mixed feelings about the lack of coherence between the Country’s statements about fur.

Book Review: “Yes, We Still Drink Coffee!”

“Yes, We Still Drink Coffee!” is a collection of powerful essays, interspersed with beautiful illustrations, that tell the stories of female human rights defenders from Egypt, Kuwait, Palestine, Tunisia, Turkey, Somalia and Sudan. Behind each story is a meeting of two women. Here is our review.

What is Ecofeminism?

Ecofeminism is a movement that unites two issues close to our hearts at STAND: women’s rights and the environment. It is perhaps one of the most useful ways we can look at a wide range of social issues we face today. However, the term may be unfamiliar to many.

Endometriosis Explained

Endometriosis affects one in every 10 women in Ireland. Carrying a huge personal and social cost. Despite this, awareness of endometriosis is sorely lacking. This STAND article aims to spread awareness of this chronic condition.

Why Ireland should have its own Green New Housing Deal

Last week, Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez brought the ‘Green New Deal for Public Housing Act’ to US congress. Our contributor Lyndsay Walsh explains why we need an Irish Green New Housing Act.

New Focus on Gender in Ireland’s Citizens’ Assembly

Ireland’s Citizens’ Assembly is shifting its focus to gender equality. Over the next six months, it will examine issues like the gender pay gap, sexual assault and how to increase women’s participation in business and politics.

Girls Challenge the Script on International Girls Day!

Girls Challenge the Script on International Girls Day!

“It’s urgent that we no longer create stories that teach children to view women and girls as second-class citizens – not when we’ve seen the level of sexism in our culture so egregiously put on display.”  

These are the words of Geena Davis: founder of the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media (GDIGM) and star of films like Thelma and Louise and A League of their Own (two films which pass the Bechdel test with flying colours). 

As part of today’s #Girlstakeover, on 11th October, the International Day of the Girl, women and girls are demanding radical change in their portrayal in films, entertainment, textbooks, advertising, video games and other communications media. Indeed, this year’s international day theme is Girlpower: Unscripted and Unstoppable! 

Media’s influence on our thoughts, beliefs, and actions is subtle yet powerful. Because stereotypes are like air – invisible but omnipresent – they are often overlooked, making them especially insidious. Unfortunately, much of what girls see in the media reinforces gender discrimination and harmful stereotypes. This affects how others view girls and how girls view themselves. 

The #RewriteHerStory takeover is inspired by recent research published by the GDIGM, Plan International, and the Girls Get Equal campaign. It analyses the 56 top-grossing films in 20 countries to assess their impact on girls – and discovered the films send a message that leadership is mostly for men, particularly older white men. Women leaders (regardless of whether they are presidents, CEOs or business owners) are far more likely to be sexualised or objectified, shown in revealing outfits or completely nude.  

The report calls for an end to harmful stereotypes and encourages making stories about female leadership normal and visible. A central message is “if girls can’t see it, they can’t be it”. This is particularly the case for women of colour who are even less likely to see characters who look like them in the media. 

Media can be a force for good, but not if it perpetuates stereotypes or –even worse – ignores women entirely. Indeed, previous research by the GDIGM showed that female characters make up only 17% of crowd scenes in films! Davis says this sends a subtle signal that 17% women’s representation is a “natural state of affairs”

I remember my mother phoning Kelloggs when I was a young girl to complain that all the cartoon characters – Cornelius Rooster, Coco Monkey, Tony the Tiger and so on – on my breakfast cereal boxes were male. The person she spoke with vainly tried to convince her that one of the Snap, Crackle and Pop trio was a girl but my mother wasn’t buying it! At the time, I didn’t realise she was setting a great example by teaching me to query women’s presence and absence in the media and other spaces.  

So, the next time you are watching Netflix or consuming other media, start paying attention to how women are portrayed and consider the ratio between female and male characters. You might be surprised what you notice once you start looking.

Please follow today’s #RewriteHerStory takeover!

 

Image courtesy of Plan International.

 

Browse more stories below or sign up to our newsletter to receive our top news straight to your inbox!

Book Review: “Yes, We Still Drink Coffee!”

“Yes, We Still Drink Coffee!” is a collection of powerful essays, interspersed with beautiful illustrations, that tell the stories of female human rights defenders from Egypt, Kuwait, Palestine, Tunisia, Turkey, Somalia and Sudan. Behind each story is a meeting of two women. Here is our review.

What is Ecofeminism?

Ecofeminism is a movement that unites two issues close to our hearts at STAND: women’s rights and the environment. It is perhaps one of the most useful ways we can look at a wide range of social issues we face today. However, the term may be unfamiliar to many.

Endometriosis Explained

Endometriosis affects one in every 10 women in Ireland. Carrying a huge personal and social cost. Despite this, awareness of endometriosis is sorely lacking. This STAND article aims to spread awareness of this chronic condition.

New Focus on Gender in Ireland’s Citizens’ Assembly

Ireland’s Citizens’ Assembly is shifting its focus to gender equality. Over the next six months, it will examine issues like the gender pay gap, sexual assault and how to increase women’s participation in business and politics.

Ireland’s Direct Provision system needs to end!

Ireland’s Direct Provision system needs to end!

Most people agree that Direct Provision (DP) is an inhumane system. It has been termed a “severe violation of human rights” by Emily Hogan from the Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission (IHREC). In many ways, the DP system is reminiscent of other shameful episodes in Irish history including Catholic industrial schools, Magdalene laundries, and mother and baby homes. 

Initially established as an interim system that would accommodate people for no more than 6 months, DP has morphed into a system in which people can become trapped for years. Latest figures show that 157 people have spent more than seven years in the system while waiting for their applications to be processed. Currently, there are about 6000 people living in the 39 DP centres across Ireland. Many still don’t have access to their own cooking facilities. People in DP live their lives in limbo, not knowing how long they will be in the system for. According to the Irish Refugee Council (IRC), this often leads to stress and mental health issues.   

DP controls central aspects of people’s lives including their ability to work and study. Until recently, asylum seekers were not allowed to work at all, although this blanket ban was declared unconstitutional last year. However, only about 15% of eligible adults have started work since then. This is because numerous restrictions make the right to work for asylum seekers more of a fantasy than a reality – including their inability to get a driver’s licence. 

Now, DP is making headlines again due to protests over plans to open a new DP centre in the village of Oughterard in County Galway. The recent burial of a transgender woman – Sylva Tukula – in an unmarked grave, without any of her loved ones present, following her death in an all-male centre in Galway city also ignited public fury – and drew attention to the failings of the system. 

IHREC has found that women within the DP system are an extremely vulnerable group and that the system negatively impacts on a wide range of women’s rights. This covers reports of harassment, including verbal abuse and proposition. AkiDwA Ireland also discussed the various human rights abuses women face in a recent submission to the Joint Committee on Justice and Equality. Other women’s rights issues have recently come to light, including women in DP being left without access to sanitary products, and access to proper abortion services due to the remote location of centres. Raising children in the centres also presents many challenges.

More generally, the for-profit nature of Ireland’s DP system has been widely condemned by the human rights community. The IRC has outlined how the accommodation of asylum seekers in remote centres without access to facilities and services exacerbates their marginalisation. It recommended centres should be in locations with easy access to educational, medical, transport, and other services. But these recommendations are largely ignored and communities which house centres are generally not consulted in advance – something which would appear a prerequisite to better integrating asylum seekers into communities. 

Clearly it is time for this system to have a radical overhaul. 

 

Organisations like MASI (the Movement of Asylum Seekers in Ireland) have been working tirelessly to end DP for many years now – and they need our support.  If you want to learn how to help: https://spunout.ie/life/article/how-can-i-help-end-direct-provision1.

 

Photo by Braca Karic on Wikimedia Commons 

 

 

Browse more stories below or sign up to our newsletter to receive our top news straight to your inbox.

 

Book Review: “Yes, We Still Drink Coffee!”

“Yes, We Still Drink Coffee!” is a collection of powerful essays, interspersed with beautiful illustrations, that tell the stories of female human rights defenders from Egypt, Kuwait, Palestine, Tunisia, Turkey, Somalia and Sudan. Behind each story is a meeting of two women. Here is our review.

What is Ecofeminism?

Ecofeminism is a movement that unites two issues close to our hearts at STAND: women’s rights and the environment. It is perhaps one of the most useful ways we can look at a wide range of social issues we face today. However, the term may be unfamiliar to many.

Endometriosis Explained

Endometriosis affects one in every 10 women in Ireland. Carrying a huge personal and social cost. Despite this, awareness of endometriosis is sorely lacking. This STAND article aims to spread awareness of this chronic condition.

Short shorts film festival 2019 in Dublin – What to remember

Earlier this month, the European Union National Institutes for Culture (EUNIC) screened some of the best short films produced all over Europe, as part of the Short Shorts film festival. Screenings were hosted by language schools and embassies across Dublin.

Why Ireland should have its own Green New Housing Deal

Last week, Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez brought the ‘Green New Deal for Public Housing Act’ to US congress. Our contributor Lyndsay Walsh explains why we need an Irish Green New Housing Act.

Single-Use Plastics levies: The Good, the Bad, and The Ugly

Last week the Minister for the Environment announced that the Irish Government would be introducing a number of levies aimed at reducing single-use plastics. Two of the most notable levies being a ‘latte levy’ on disposable cups and a plastic bag levy increase. This is good news – so why has there been a murmur of controversy around this announcement?

Women’s economic and social rights play crucial role in countries’ development

Women’s economic and social rights play crucial role in countries’ development

“[T]he promotion and protection of women’s rights play a fundamental role in progress for states as they unite health, human rights and development . . .” 

 

This is a quote from exciting new research published in the BMJ Open Journal which shows there is a clear link between protecting women’s rights and better health and development.

The recent study of 158 countries revealed countries which “highly respected” women’s economic and social rights had better health outcomes and were more likely to have “accelerated development” compared with countries which “poorly respected” these rights. 

The report focuses on the economic and social rights of women, and the knock-on effect on the health and development of countries when these rights are supported. According to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, economic rights include “the right to work” and the right to equal pay for equal work.” Social rights of women include “the right to education” and “the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of [her]self.” 

The study divided countries into groups depending on how well respected women’s economic and social rights were in the country. 44 countries fell into the group of countries which “highly respected” these rights, 51 countries were in the group which “moderately respected” them, while 63 countries were in the group which “poorly respected” them.  

Interestingly, even countries with a lack of resources such as hospital beds and doctors, but which strongly supported and promoted women’s rights, “would still arrive at positive health outcomes”

For instance, life expectancy in Chile, a country that highly respects women’s economic and social rights, is 79 years. By comparison, life expectancy in the Bahamas, a country with low respect for women’s economic and social rights, is 74 years. There is also a much higher under-five mortality rate (14.786%) in the Bahamas than in Chile (8.957%), despite Chile having fewer physicians and hospitals beds. 

Not only does upholding women’s rights lead to better health, but it also leads to greater overall development for countries. Development is measured on the HDI (Human Development Index) and involves access to long life, access to knowledge and access to a decent standard of living. Countries which respected women’s economic and social rights generally had higher HDI rankings. 

These results provide yet another compelling reason for why women’s rights must be a priority for all countries. 

As the researchers wrote, “[r]ather than limit progress, human rights, and [women’s economic and social rights] in particular, can only benefit them.”

 

Photo by UN Women Asia and the Pacific

 

 

Browse more stories below or sign up to our newsletter to get our top news straight to your inbox.

 

Book Review: “Yes, We Still Drink Coffee!”

“Yes, We Still Drink Coffee!” is a collection of powerful essays, interspersed with beautiful illustrations, that tell the stories of female human rights defenders from Egypt, Kuwait, Palestine, Tunisia, Turkey, Somalia and Sudan. Behind each story is a meeting of two women. Here is our review.

What is Ecofeminism?

Ecofeminism is a movement that unites two issues close to our hearts at STAND: women’s rights and the environment. It is perhaps one of the most useful ways we can look at a wide range of social issues we face today. However, the term may be unfamiliar to many.

Endometriosis Explained

Endometriosis affects one in every 10 women in Ireland. Carrying a huge personal and social cost. Despite this, awareness of endometriosis is sorely lacking. This STAND article aims to spread awareness of this chronic condition.

New Focus on Gender in Ireland’s Citizens’ Assembly

Ireland’s Citizens’ Assembly is shifting its focus to gender equality. Over the next six months, it will examine issues like the gender pay gap, sexual assault and how to increase women’s participation in business and politics.

Witches – a History of Misogyny

On this All-Hallows Eve, witches will be painting the town black. But while witches continue to fascinate as feminist symbols, the history of the witch is also bound up with a history of misogyny that still persists today.

Abortion and gay marriage: change is coming in Northern Ireland

Yesterday, a plenary session was held in Stormont, Northern Ireland’s Assembly. The Assembly, which has not sat in over a thousand days, was brought back together to try and vote about the decriminalisation of abortion and the legalisation of same sex marriage.