Earlier this month, the European Union National Institutes for Culture (EUNIC) screened some of the best short films produced all over Europe, as part of the Short Shorts film festival. Screenings were hosted by language schools and embassies across Dublin. 

Close to a dozen films were shown, and the audience was asked to vote for their favourite. Films in  competition were: : Tutorial (Goethe-Institut Irland) Fig (Embassy of Greece), Una casa en el campo (Instituto Cervantes/AECID), Non mi posso lamentare (Istituto Italiano Di Cultura – Dublino), Creatures (Polish Embassy Dublin), Thermostat 6 (Alliance Française de Dublin), Nachsaison (Embassy of Austria), Dodgy Dave (British Council Ireland), Late Afternoon (Culture Ireland). What Remains (Irish Film Institute) and Mr Ripple (Cork Film Festival) were also screened but did not take part in the competition.

The movies were a delight to watch. The common theme across the festival was that of forgotten or rekindled human connections. Be it that of love through years, or that of a child looking after her mom, or a girl’s quest to get her voice heard.. The audience seemed to have taken a liking towards two films namely, Una casa en el campo, the entry from Spain, and Fig the official entry from Greece. My personal favourite was “Fig” because I am a closet romantic. An injured man struggles through every unimaginable obstacle to fulfilling his dying wife’s last wish to eat a fig. This story will resonate with the audience of all ages and for times to come (see the trailer here). However, the award for best short went to rightly deserving Una casa en el campo (see the trailer here). The short film cleverly portrays invisible human connections, especially those that are sometimes unwelcome. The film shows the encounter between two neighbours for the first time. Despite their houses being separated by a wall, one of them seem to know everything about the other’s life. By using humour, the film shows that walls may not necessarily keep your lives private after all. Definitely a thought to ponder upon!

 

Photo by France in Ireland on Twitter

 

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